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  • 1. Atienza, Ricardo
    et al.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. Royal College of Music.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Playing the design: Creating soundscapes through playful interaction2023In: SMC 2023 - Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference 2023, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2023, p. 362-369Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes inspiration from provocative design methods to gain knowledge on sound preferences regarding future vehicles’ designed sounds. A particular population subset was a triggering component of this study: people with hearing impairments. To that aim, we have developed a public installation in which to test a hypothetical futuristic city square. It includes three electrical vehicles whose sound can be designed by the visitor. The interface allows the user to interact and play with a number of provided sonic textures within a real-time web application, thus “playing” the design. This opens a design space of three distinct sounds that are mixed into an overall soundscape presented in a multichannel immersive environment. The paper describes the design processes involved. 

  • 2.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH.
    Mattias, Sköld
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. KTH.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions.  We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 3.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH.
    Creating digital musical instruments with and for children: Including vocal sketching as a method for engaging in codesign2020In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A class of master of science students and a group of preschool children codesigned new digital musical instruments based on workshop interviews involving vocal sketching, a method for imitating and portraying sounds. The aim of the study was to explore how the students and children would approach vocal sketching as one of several design methods. The children described musical instruments to the students using vocal sketching and other modalities (verbal, drawing, gestures). The resulting instruments built by the students were showcased at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts in Stockholm. Although all the children tried vocal sketching during preparatory tasks, few employed the method during the workshop. However, the instruments seemed to meet the children’s expectations. Consequently, even though the vocal sketching method alone provided few design directives in the given context, we suggest that vocal sketching, under favorable circumstances, can be an engaging component that complements other modalities in codesign involving children.

  • 4.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] ACM, ACM: ACM Publications, 2019, Vol. 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 5.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    IMMERSIVE AND INTERACTIVE MUSIC FOR EVERYONE2019In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 (NSMC2019) and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019 (ISON2019) / [ed] Andre Holzapfel and Sandra Pauletto, Stockholm, 2019, p. 16-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to understand how new and accessible technology can be used and developed to include produc- ers of standard music into making immersive, interactive, music experiences. Through observations during a stu- dent project and an analysis of the participant’s reflections it argues that even if the technology worked well, there are still many opportunities for improvements. The result shows that the repeated, non-creative, tasks like exporting and naming files can reduce musical inspiration for stu- dents with little interest in technology and that further de- velopment and studies potentially could make interactive music accessible even for them. The aspect of the project that caused most positive response was producing and and mixing for super-surround which led the students to new insights and ideas for their everyday music production. Finally the result indicates that even if there would have been no technical barriers interactive music production might not appeal to everyone. Interactive music should maybe be seen as a separate discipline and students with a linear approach to composition will not necessarily find it inter- esting.

  • 6.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Music without an end: students perspective on music production for an interactive exhibition2017In: SMC Sweden 2017, Stockholm, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 7.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    WebAudioXML: Proposing a new standard for structuring web audio2020In: Sound and Music Computing Conference, Zenodo , 2020, p. 25-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present WebAudioXML as a suggested candidate for establishing a standard for describing Web Audio config- urations. The aim is to lower the barrier for artistic cre- ators for working within web audio applications as well as providing a modular system that can integrate into larger applications. WebAudioXML provides means for mak- ing interactive music without having to learn a program- ming language like JavaScript and consists of an XML syntax specification and a parser. The framework has been developed with and tested by audio experts and lecturers from music production and Sound and Music Computing. Workshop participants report that WebAudioXML has po- tential in keeping focus on the creative process instead of web development. We argue that an XML standard for Web Audio configurations would be beneficial for modular and collaborative development and therefore recommend a wider discussion on the topic. With the discussion we aim to promote the artistic in the making of interactive audio applications.

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