Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Improvisaation psykologiaa2022In: Musiikkipsykologia / [ed] Louhivuori, J., Saarikallio, S. & Toiviainen, P., Jyväskylä: Eino Roiha -säätiö , 2022, 2, p. 437-460Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Musiikin analyysi ja psykologia2022In: Musiikkipsykologia / [ed] Louhivuori, J., Saarikallio, S. & Toiviainen, P., Jyväskylä: Eino Roiha -säätiö , 2022, 2, p. 39-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Theories of Creativity in Music: Students' Theory Appraisal and Argumentation2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, p. 1-22, article id 612739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on people's conceptions regarding creativity has concerned informal beliefs instead of more complex belief systems represented in scholarly theories of creativity. The relevance of general theories of creativity to the creative domain of music may also be unclear because of the mixed responses these theories have received from music researchers. The aim of the present study was to gain a better comparative understanding of theories of creativity as accounts of musical creativity by allowing students to assess them from a musical perspective. In the study, higher-education music students rated 10 well-known theories of creativity as accounts of four musical target activities—composition, improvisation, performance, and ideation—and argued for the “best theoretical perspectives” in written essays. The results showed that students' theory appraisals were significantly affected by the target activities, but also by the participants' prior musical experiences. Students' argumentative strategies also differed between theories, especially regarding justifications by personal experiences and values. Moreover, theories were most typically problematized when discussing improvisation. The students most often chose to defend the Four-Stage Model, Divergent Thinking, and Systems Theory, while theories emphasizing strategic choices or Darwinian selection mechanisms were rarely found appealing. Overall, students tended toward moderate theory eclecticism, and their theory appraisals were seen to be pragmatic and example-based, instead of aiming for such virtues as broad scope or consistency. The theories were often used as definitions for identifying some phenomena of interest rather than for making stronger explanatory claims about such phenomena. Students' theory appraisals point to some challenges for creativity research, especially regarding the problems of accounting for improvisation, and concerning the significance of theories that find no support in these musically well-informed adults' reasoning.

  • 4.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Tonaliteetti2022In: Musiikkipsykologia / [ed] Louhivuori, J., Saarikallio, S. & Toiviainen, P., Jyväskylä: Eino Roiha -säätiö , 2022, 2, p. 151-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keipi, Aaro
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Improvising on Emotion Terms: Students’ Strategies, Emotional Communication, and Aesthetic Value2021In: Journal of research in music education, ISSN 0022-4294, E-ISSN 1945-0095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies in musical improvisation show that musicians and even children are able to communicate intended emotions to listeners at will. To understand emotional expressivity in music as an art form, communicative success needs to be related to improvisers’ thought processes and listeners’ aesthetic judgments. In the present study, we used retrospective verbal protocols to address college music students’ strategies in improvisations based on emotion terms. We also subjected their improvisations to expert ratings in terms of heard emotional content and aesthetic value. A qualitative analysis showed that improvisers used both generative strategies (expressible in intramusical terms) and imaginative, extramusical strategies when approaching the improvisation tasks. The clarity of emotional communication was found to be high overall, and linear mixed-effects models showed that it was supported by generative approaches. However, perceived aesthetic value was unrelated to such emotional clarity. Instead, aesthetic value was associated with emotional complexity, here defined as the heard presence of “nonintended” emotions. The results point toward a view according to which the expressive content of improvisation gets specified and personalized during the very act of improvisation itself. Arguably, musical expressivity in improvisation should not be equated with the error-free communication of previously intended emotional categories.

  • 6.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Timoshenko, Maria
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Nyström, Marcus
    Eye movements in sight singing: A study with experts.2021In: Psychomusicology, ISSN 0275-3987, E-ISSN 2162-1535, Vol. 31, no 3-4, p. 134-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In comparison with instrumental sight reading of musical notation, sight singing is typically characterized by the presence of lyrics. The purpose of this study was to explore how skilled sight singers divide their visual attention between written music and lyrics and how their eye-movement behavior is influenced by musical stimulus complexity. Fourteen competent musicians performed 10 newly composed songs in a restricted temporal condition (60 bpm). Eye movements and vocal performances were recorded and complemented with posttask complexity ratings and interviews. In the interviews, the singers emphasized the priority of focusing on the melody instead of the lyrics. Accordingly, eye-movement analyses indicated not only more total fixation time on music than lyrics but also longer fixation durations, longer durations of visits (i.e., sequences of fixations), and a larger number of fixations per visit on music than on lyrics. The singers also more typically arrived at a bar by glancing first at the music instead of lyrics. Generalized linear mixed-model analyses showed that the number of notes and accidentals in a bar influenced the fixation time and that pupil dilation was increased by a larger number of accidentals. Measurements of eye–voice span, that is, the temporal distance between fixating and singing a note, were best predicted by phrase structure and the note density of previous melodic material. According to the interviews, the best sight singers’ approaches were characterized by a flexibility of moving between different sight-singing strategies. The study offers a comprehensive overview regarding the bottom-up and top-down aspects affecting sight-singing performance.

  • 7.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Tuuri, Kai
    University of Jyväskylä, Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies.
    Music students’ accounts of their pleasant musical imagery: Aspects of voluntariness and narrative meaning-making2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Loimusalo, Nina Johanna
    Jyväskylä Universitet.
    Expert Pianists’ Practice Perspectives: A Production and Listening Study2020In: Musicae scientiae, ISSN 1029-8649, E-ISSN 2045-4147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how professional pianists practice music for a concert, and whether their individual cognitive orientations in such practice processes can be identified accurately from the resulting performances. In Study I, four pianists, previously found to be skilled music memorizers, practiced and performed a short piece by André Jolivet over the course of two weeks, during which their practice strategies were studied using semi-structured interviews, and analyses of practice diaries, practice activities, and eye-movement data. The results indicate that the pianists used similar basic strategies but had different cognitive orientations, here called “practice perspectives,” consistent with each individual, in that they focused on different kinds of information while practicing. These practice perspectives may be related to skills and habits in using imagery and music analysis, as well as to professional and educational background. In Study II, 34 piano teachers listened to recordings of the concert performances and evaluated them against 12 statements representing the four practice perspectives identified in Study I. The results did not support the prediction that practice perspectives would be correctly detected by listeners. Nonetheless, practice perspectives can be used to highlight potentially vast differences between the ways in which individual professional classical musicians conceptualize music and make it meaningful to themselves and others. They could be used in the context of music education to increase musicians’ knowledge of different practice strategies and the ability to develop their own preferred working methods.

  • 9.
    Loimusalo-Lipiäinen, Nina
    et al.
    JAMK University of Applied Sciences & University of Jyväskylä.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Pianists’ music reading and styles of mental practice2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Puurtinen, Marjaana
    et al.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ylitalo, Anna-Kaisa
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Cognitive Mechanisms in Temporally Controlled Rhythm Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements2023In: Music perception, ISSN 0730-7829, E-ISSN 1533-8312, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music-reading research has not yet fully grasped the variety and roles of different cognitive mechanisms that underlie visual processing of music notation; instead, studies have often explored one factor at a time. Based on prior research, we identified three possible cognitive mechanisms regarding visual processing during music reading: symbol comprehension, visual anticipation, and symbol performance demands. We also summed up the eye-movement indicators of each mechanism. We then asked which of the three cognitive mechanisms were needed to explain how note symbols are visually processed during temporally controlled rhythm reading. In our eye-tracking study, twenty-nine participants performed simple rhythm-tapping tasks, in which the relative complexity of consecutive rhythm symbols was systematically varied. Eye-time span (i.e., ‘‘looking ahead’’) and first-pass fixation time at target symbols were analyzed with linear mixed-effects modeling. As a result, the mechanisms symbol comprehension and visual anticipation found support in our empirical data, whereas evidence for symbol performance demands was more ambiguous. Future studies could continue from here by exploring the interplay of these and other possible mechanisms; in general, we argue that music-reading research should begin to emphasize the systematic creating and testing of cognitive models of eye movements in music reading. 

  • 11.
    Uddholm, Mats
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Om professionella aktörers musikpedagogiska definitionsmakt: En kulturhistorisk studie av samband mellan musikpedagogisk teori och definitionsmakt2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to illuminate which role theories of music education can have in the dialectic between discourse and competence in the practice of music pedagogy. The thesis stems from a problem-oriented project that resulted in the formulation of the following research question: how can the connection between music education theory and the power of definition be described and problematized from a cultural-historical perspective using Vygotsky's thesis of Semiotic Thinking? In his research on the dual function of language Vygotsky makes a distinction between the usage of concepts and conceptualization. In this study this distinction has been crucial to determining the relationship between music education theory and the power of definition as practised in music pedagogy. The research project comprised a background study and three sub-studies. The focus of the background-study was the conditions for musical learning and development in persons with severe cognitive dysfunctions. The first sub-study dealt with how social workers in this area of special education conceptualise their view of music in relation to their understanding of music activities in their own practice. The second sub-study aimed to explore which concepts music-therapists use in their meta-reflections on musical situations in this area of special education. The purpose of the third sub-study was to formulate a theoretical perspective on the relationship between music education theory and the power of definition using Vygotsky's hypothesis of semiotic thinking. The main conclusions are: first, that music education theory can be understood as a structural coupling between the power of definition that is embedded in music-pedagogical discourse as a whole, and the power of definition possessed by music pedagogues; second, that the development of the power of definition in the practice of music pedagogy is a creative process that in turn entails a critical questioning of music education theory.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT02
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf