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  • 1.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Den nordiska vallåtens tonspråk2019In: Fäbodlandskap och vallmusik / [ed] Jennie Tiderman-Österberg, Falun: Dalarnas Fornminnes och Hembygdsförbund , 2019, 1, p. 115-119Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln presenterar musikaliska egenskaper i traditionell fäbodmusikens i Sverige, med fokus på vallmusikens tonalitét, melodik och form. Artikeln sammanfattar ny forskning i fäbodmusikens tonspråk på ett enkelt sätt och nya rön baserade på unika  korpusstudier med metoder hämtade från modern kognitiv musikforskning ställs i relation till tidiga musikvetenskapliga studier av ämnet.

  • 2.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    MITIS - Musical Information  Technology in Schools: How can interactive  music technology be used to support learning of music literacy?2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    MITIS – Musical Informational Technology in School

    The aim of the MITIS - project is to explore possibilities to create interactive teaching materials where new technology is used to distribute knowledge about musical structure (i.e. notation) as well as content in an interactive and creative way. This is carried out as a collaborative project between a group of music teachers, the company DoReMir, and researchers and staff from the Institution for Folk Music and the Institution for Music, Pedagogics and Society at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

    The core foundation of the project is literacy in music – for example reading and writing notation (Asmus, 2004). Notation is for most musicians an important tool to use both for taking part of, interpreting, documenting and pass music on (Hultberg, 2000). In connection with the digitalization of society and digital tools to do things such as interpreting, documenting and pass music on made available to a broader public, traditional notation has got a more hidden place in music education in schools. In the Swedish curricula for the compulsory School, notation is explicitly mentioned in 1969. In the later Curricula’s, different kind of notation is mentioned, but not as explicitly as in earlier years (Skolöverstyrelsen, 1969; Skolverket, 2019). This also aligns with the development of society as a whole, and with the strategy for digitalization that was established by the Swedish government in 2017 (Regeringen, 2017) and can be seen as a development towards a wider view on different forms of notation. However, in the aesthetic program for the upper secondary school, reading traditional notation on a basic level, is required in the Curricula (Skolverket, 2020). Furthermore, to get access to higher music education in Sweden, the skill of reading traditional notation, is required. We argue therefore, that to increase music literacy, also in regard to reading notation, can be seen as an democratic issue. To make learning notation available and possible in an easy and digitalized way, with devices available to pupils in school, may be an important step to advance possibilities for every child to access higher music education.

    An important part of the project is to develop and support learning and interpretation of notation in different creative ways. One of the starting points for this project is the technique for digital music interpretation that has been developed by DoReMir Music Research AB. This technique has been used in an app called Notysing, for learning to read and sing traditional notation with a digital device such as a reading tablet or mobile phone. The project has been running since 2018. The first year the focus was to develop the app, test it within a small group of music teachers, and ensure good technical quality as well as pedagogical foundations for the design. In 2019 testing started in compulsory as well as in upper secondary School in Sweden, with focus on gathering qualitative data through a digital survey in the app. During autumn 2020 a qualitive study has been conducted, and in-depth interviews are in progress. Pupils in San Diego has been included in 2020, also as a part of finding new teaching strategies for distance education during the Covid19 pandemic. It has been developed and tested with over 200 pupils and music teachers.

    Preliminary results suggest that pupils and music teachers are positive to learn notation through an app that uses gamification to enhance and motivate learning, and that issues that arise are mostly technical, and that the equipment of the schools, and technical skills ana knowledge of the music teacher are crucial for success. Furthermore, the results indicate that regards must be taken to

    different systems for managing IT in different schools and municipalities. Last but not least, there are great school-cultural differences in how schools work with notation in San Diego and in Sweden, which once again raises questions about how to work with it in our context, and also, why we work with it the way we currently do.

    References

    Asmus, E. P. (2004). Music Teaching and Music Literacy. Journal of Music Teacher Education, 13(2), 6–8. https://doi.org/10.1177/10570837040130020102

    Hultberg, C. (2000). The Printed Score As a Mediator of Musical Meaning – Approaches to Musical notation on Western Tonal Tradition. [Doctoral thesis, Malmö Academy of Music].

    Regeringen. (2017). Nationell digitaliseringsstrategi för skolväsendet. Utbildningsdepartementet: Bilaga till regeringsbeslut I:1, 2017-10-19.

    Skolöverstyrelsen. (1969). Läroplan för grundskolan 1 Allmän del. Utbildningsförlaget

    Skolverket (2019). Läroplan för grundskolan, förskoleklassen och fritidshemmet 2011. Reviderad 2019. Skolverket. Skolverket.( 2020). https://www.skolverket.se/undervisning/gymnasieskolan/laroplan-program-och-amnen-i-gymnasieskolan/gymnasieprogrammen/amne?url=1530314731%2Fsyllabuscw%2Fjsp%2Fsubject.htm%3FsubjectCode%3DMUS%26courseCode%3DMUSINS01S%26tos%3Dgy&sv.url=12.5dfee44715d35a5cdfa92a3#anchor_MUSINS01

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  • 3.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Notysing – notläsning för alla!2021Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 4.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Stylistic Feature Mapping for Music Performance2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stylistic Feature Mapping for Music Performance 

    In the late 1970s, the Royal College of Music in Stockholm (KMH) started professional performance programs for musicians outside the domain of Western Classical Music, including e.g. Jazz and Swedish Folk music. In the beginning, it was regarded an opportunity for informally trained musicians in these genres to receive proper music education. 

    However, it soon became clear that these students, in order to develop their artistic practice within their own genres within the domain of academic music performance training, needed terminology, concepts and methods for to describe the values, aesthetics, expressions, musical structures, instrumental techniques etc. of importance in their musical practice. 

    In the clash between musical styles developed outside of the music academies and the art music with its rich history of prescriptive descriptive concepts, there was a need for communication of expressional qualities between different musical styles – and this need for revealing the tacit knowledge of non- academic performers were in particular prominent in Folk Music. An artistic research project was initiated, conducted between 1983 and 1987 (Ahlbäck 1987), with the aim to study, document and describe performance style and techniques in Swedish fiddle music from a performance perspective, however making style comparisons possible. 

    One outcome of the project was a system for description and mapping of performance style qualities, and this ‘style mapping model’ originally developed for fiddle music emerged into a more general model for describing performance style qualities that has been used in artistic reflective training and in thesis work at KMH for more than 30 years, as a tool for developing, describing, documenting and communicating artistic directions and concepts. 

    This paper discusses the features of this model in relation to musicological and music psychological approaches to music expression and style and presents empirical results from the application of the system within performance training for over 30 years including over 250 students, as well as examples of influences on contemporary musical practice. 

    How has this approach been used for development of musical concepts in different artistic reflective works? What can be learned from applying this mapping system in the meeting between musicians with different musical values? 

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  • 5.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    ”We hear what we know” - On the power of concepts: how traditional fiddle music in contemporary society can benefit fromfolk music theory2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ”We hear what we know” - On the power of conceptsand how traditional fiddle music in contemporary society can benefit fromfolk music theorySwedish fiddle music, just as many other fiddle traditions, has a strong connection to dance. Making people want to move their feet is one of the chief tasks ofthe fiddler, and this connection still influences the music today, even thoughthe music might be played on concert stages or be digitally streamed.So what constitutes this knowledge of the fiddler? What is important when playing a certain local styleof Swedish polska so people actually can dance to it?    If you live in an isolated community with no contact with the outside world you might not have to reflect on what is the stylistic features of your tradition but today folk music generally lives in a multi-stylistic world where different value systemsthat originates from other music traditions than fiddle music dominates. Today’s fiddlers will have to relate to today’s world of music, whether we want it or not.In Sweden, since the 19th century, there has been a tradition of mystifying the knowledge of the fiddler, making the competence of playing a matter of socio-cultural background,  geography and ancestry.The perils of this view is that the qualities of  art of fiddling might be obscuredand  actually might be lost when music transforms - as music always do.In this talk Sven Ahlbäck, who is a traditional fiddler deeply rooted in traditional Swedish FolkMusic and very involved in development of new ensemble playing and teaching, will talkabout how conceptualising stylistic qualities of Swedish fiddle music such as e.g.asymmetrical beats, swing, bowing and intonation have influenced the developmentof today’s Swedish folk music, even beyond the fiddle.

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  • 6.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    What does AI learn from music?: on the problem of ground truth in music and the power of concepts2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many AI applications on music relates to music theoretical models, in the sense of musical concepts and ideas of how music works, that are not always made explicit, explicitly discussed or questioned. Already the choice of representations of music and sound as well as the selection of data for training models can influence models and creative output greatly. Here we will give some examples of problems arising when modelling basic musical features, from the experience of developing  automatic music notation.

  • 7.
    Alexandersson, Sara
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Sångens roll i filmmusik: En undersökning om filmmusik utan film kan gestalta en tydlig berättelse med känsla och budskap.2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One thing that has inspired me about film music is that it has always managed to easily pull me into a different reality. In this essay I have gone deeper into different methods of convey- ing storytelling through music. I have composed nine songs to four different filmmakers materials. This was performed at KMH the 6th of April. I did some thorough research before composing, which affected my way of approaching the music. The methods I used was proven helpful for me, not only in a compositional stage, but useful also in my vocal interpretation, when conveying the material to a band and when thinking about how the concert was going to be executed. I will use these methods further in my work as a singer and composer.

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    Examensarbete - Sara Alexandersson
    Download (mp3)
    Slutet Money Man - separat bilaga
  • 8.
    Carron, Pontus
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Classical Music.
    Sergei Rachmaninov: Pianosonat nr. 2 i B-moll op. 36 (1931)2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sergei Rachmaninov är en av de allra största profilerna som funnits inom den klassiska musiken. Den ryske pianisten, dirigenten och kompositören med de jättelika händerna var en av de allra sista romantiska tonsättarna och var inspirerad av äldre ryska tonsättare som Tchaikovsky och Rimsky-Korsakov och hade pianot som central punkt i sitt komponerande. Genom sin pianistiska skicklighet utforskade Rachmaninov instrumentets möjligheter till bredden med verk som ”Etudes Tableaux” opus 33 och 39, den första pianosonaten (op. 28) och pianokonserterna (op. 1, 18, 30 och 40) för att nämna några. Den andra pianosonaten i Bb-moll, op. 36, kom att bli ett av de största, mest kända och krävande verk för solopiano som Rachmaninov komponerade. Sonaten skrevs 1913 och fick ett gott mottagande när den uruppfördes i december samma år med Rachmaninov själv vid flygeln.

    Syftet med den här uppsatsen är att grundligt gå igenom bakgrunden till sonaten som troligtvis är ett av de verk Rachmaninov arbetat på mest, och att ge en praktisk guide för andra som önskar spela sonaten.

    I kapitel 2 kommer jag göra en kort sammanfattning av Rachmaninovs liv och belysa relevant information om mannen bakom verket. Det tredje kapitlet handlar om bakgrunden till sonaten, tiden innan den skrevs och de olika versionerna och det fjärde kapitlet är en djupdykning i notbild och text och hur jag gått till väga med övning och framförande. Slutligen avslutas denna text med en kort slutsats.

  • 9.
    Demirel, Emir
    et al.
    Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Dixon, Simon
    Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom.
    A RECURSIVE SEARCH METHOD FOR LYRICS ALIGNMENT2020In: https://www.music-ir.org/mirex/wiki/2020:MIREX2020_Results, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Audio-to-lyrics transcription and alignment requires strong acoustic and language models that are trained on in-domain data and a well-adapted pronunciation model for singing. Even in the presence of such models, the length of audio segments for decoding remains a challenge. In this year’s MIREX submission, we present a recursive search method that splits the audio with respect to anchor- ing words for performing alignment on shorter audio seg- ments. The recursive is applied through gradually restrict- ing the language model and search space after each search iteration. We apply a final pass of forced alignment on the segmented audio to obtain timings for every word in the input song lyrics. According to the initial experiments, our system is robust to various musical genre while being executable on local machines with low memory and com- putational resources.

  • 10.
    Demirel, Emir
    et al.
    Centre for Digital Music Queen Mary University of London.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Dixon, Simon
    Centre for Digital Music Queen Mary University of London.
    Automatic Lyrics Transcription using Dilated Convolutional Neural Networks with Self-Attention2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech recognition is a well developed research field so that the current state of the art systems are being used in many applications in the software industry, yet as by today, there still does not exist such robust system for the recognition of words and sentences from singing voice. This paper proposes a complete pipeline for this task which may commonly be referred as automatic lyrics transcription (ALT). We have trained convolutional time-delay neural networks with self-attention on monophonic karaoke recordings using a sequence classification objective for building the acoustic model. The dataset used in this study, DAMP - Sing! 300x30x2 [1] is filtered to have songs with only English lyrics. Different language models are tested including MaxEnt and Recurrent Neural Networks based methods which are trained on the lyrics of pop songs in English. An in-depth analysis of the self-attention mechanism is held while tuning its context width and the number of attention heads. Using the best settings, our system achieves significant improvement to the state-of-the-art in ALT and provides a new baseline for the task.

  • 11.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH.
    Mattias, Sköld
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. KTH.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions.  We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 12.
    Granberg, Anita
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Det måste få ta tid: En studie av musikterapeuters verksamhet i skolan2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    x

  • 13.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    I en snårskog av traditioner: musikproduktion och musikteknik i den högre musikutbildningen utifrån ett svenskt perspektiv2020In: Music Technology in Education: Channeling And Challenging Perspectives / [ed] J. Eiksund, E. Angelo & J. Knigge, Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2020, 1, p. 23-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify traditions that can be valued as important in Swedish higher education in music production and music technology, to explore what characterizes such traditions and how they can be important for students in music production education. The research material consists of a selec- tion of previous research and other literature that concerns music production and traditions in higher education. A knowledge-critical analysis method and a peda- gogical model for higher education with a focus on what the students do and how they relate to teaching and education have been used to analyse the research mate- rial. The analysis shows that there are many different traditions in higher music education. Some traditions are very old, and some are also difficult to interpret and therefore the understanding of such traditions can be challenging for both students and teachers in higher education in music production and music technology.

  • 14.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Gardemar, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Gislason Ferrari, Eleonore
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Schyborger, Peter
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Pop(ulär)musik nu och för hundra år sedan: likheter och skillnader mellan Max Martin och Irving Berlin2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie fokuserar på kärnegenskaper hos två mycket framgångsrika upphovspersoner inom populärmusik: Irving Berlin (1888-1989) och Martin Sandberg (1971-), också känd som Max Martin. Även om det naturligtvis finns stora skillnader i det omgivande samhället och den kultur där Berlin var och Sandberg är aktiv, finns ändå uppenbara likheter mellan de båda. I denna delstudie, som ingår i projektet Searching for Sophia in Music Production, presenterar vi en kunskapskritisk analys av två intervjuer; en med Irving Berlin och en med Martin Sandberg. Intervjun med Berlin genomfördes av Frank Ward O'Malley (1875-1932) och var ursprungligen publicerad i "The American Magazine", Volym 90, oktober 1920, där Berlin presenterade "Nine Rules for Writing Popular Songs". Intervjun med Martin Sandberg genomförde vi själva i november 2019 där vi, bland annat, bad honom bedöma en musikproduktions- och låtskrivarmodell som vi själva tagit fram baserad på strategier som användes av Dag Volle (1963– 1998), även känd som Denniz PoP. Vi har i tidigare delstudier utvecklat denna modell och Volle är mycket intressant som studieobjekt eftersom han, trots att han saknade formell musikutbildning, var en mycket framgångsrik svensk musikproducent och även lade grunden till att utveckla nya innovativa musikproduktionsmetoder som flera av hans medarbetare, där ibland Martin Sandberg, har fortsatt att använda och utveckla vidare. I analysen jämförs Berlins reflektioner kring sin egen modell ”Nine Rules for Writing Popular Songs” och Sandbergs reflektioner över vår egen Denniz PoP-modell. Undersökningsresultaten visar på stora likheter, men också vissa tydliga skillnader, mellan vilka aspekter som Berlin och Sandberg betonar som viktiga för hur upphovspersoner kan eller bör agera för att kunna skapa musik som lever upp till egna konstnärliga mål och även når stor popularitet. Erfarenheter från denna studie bör därför kunna bidra med värdefull kunskap till artister, musiker, musikproducenter och andra verksamma, som till exempel studenter, inom pop(ulär)musikproduktion.

  • 15.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Hepworth-Sawyer, RussToulson, RobPaterson, Justin
    Innovation in Music 2022: Book of Abstracts: CONFERENCE PROGRAMME 17-19 June 20222022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in Music 2022

    FRIDAY 2022-06-17 

    Welcome to Innovation in music 2022! - 15:30 1C103 - Lilla salen 1

    Keynote 1: Armen Shaomian - 15:45 - 1C103 - Lilla salen  1

    Panel 1: Entrepreneurship, Copyright, & Innovation in Music: Linda Portnoff, Christian Råsmark, Thomas Arctaedius & Örjan Strandberg 15:30 - 1C103 - Lilla salen  1

    Seminar with online presenters 17:30 - Lilla salen 

    Paul Novotny: How to Put Together a Premium DIY Dolby Atmos 'Tiny Studio' on a Budget  

    Anders Lind: Music for the mobile phone orchestra, string orchestra and analog synthesizers: An evaluation of a concert hall performance including 15-year-old non musicians as performers  2

    Pedro Miguel Ferreira: Road(ies) To Nowhere? A Portuguese live music perspective, Eirik Askerøi: Sonic Markers in Popular Music: Innovation - Trend - Tradition, Ola Buan Øien: The Dialogue of Mr. Question Mark and Sylvia Massy: Challenging norms at the intersection of crafts and creativity in music recording contexts  3

    SATURDAY 2022-06-18  

    Welcome with music: Henry Mikkonen & Martin Åberg 08:45 - Lilla salen  4

    Seminar with online presenters 09:00 - Lilla salen  4

    Yuxiang Cai, Rui Liu and Xuefeng Zhou: An investigation of piano timbre preference based on employing equalizer to adjust the harmonic loudness, Martin Koszolko: Connecting across borders: communication tools, group structures and practices of remote music collaborators, Hussein Boon: Two Production Strategies for Music Synchronisation As Speculative Entrepreneurship  5

    Yngvar Kjus, Ragnhild Brøvig-Hanssen & Solveig Wang: Encountering new technology: A study of how female creators explore DAWs, Scott Stickland, Nathan Scott & Rukshan Athauda: The DAW Collaboration Framework: Improving Creative Opportunities and Authenticity in Collaborative Online Audio Mixing  6

    Samuel Lynch & Helen English, Jon Drummond, Nathan Scott: Exploring Dynamic Music Methods to Extend Compositional Outcomes  7

    Session 1 A 10:20-12.00 - 1C103 (Lilla salen) 

    Ingvild Koksvik: Staging Notions of Space: Developing a Practice-Based Model for Realizing Compositional Intention in 3D and Stereo Record Production  8

    Grzegorz Trela: The sound from behind the Iron Curtain: Record production in the Polish People's Republic  8

    Marc Estibeiro: An interactive chamber work for two classical guitars and electronics which uses the natural sound of the acoustic instruments as both source material for electronic processing and as a means of controlling the electronic part  9

    Stephen Bruel: Remastering Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  9

    Session 1 B 10:20-12.00 (1D221)  9

    Claus Sohn Andersen: The space is the place - Interplay and interaction in an extreme location  9

    Matthew Lovett: Artificial creativity and tools for understanding: music, creative labour and AI  10

    Tony Dupé: Self Production as a Creative Practice  10

    Leigh Shields: Exploring the history of distortion in Drum and Bass  11

    Session 1 C 10:20-12.00 (1E207)  11

    Matthias Jung & Vegard Kummen: Hacking the concert experience - exploring co-creative audience interaction at a chiptune live performance  11

    Haoran Jiang: A History of Taiwan's Recording Industry: Production and Promotion Strategies of Campus Song Records by Synco Corporation  12

    Mat Dalgleish: Unconventional Inputs: The Modular Synthesizer as One-Handed Instrument 12

    Shib Shankar Chowdhury: Autoethnography and composition for Innovative music creation about Pandemic with reference to "I Am Virus"  13

    Keynote 2: Susanne Rosenberg 13:00-13:50 - 1C103 (Lilla salen)  13

    Session 2 A 14:00-15:40 - 1C103 (Lilla salen)  14

    Håkan Lindberg: Innovation solving problems with vocal recordings  14

    Emil Kraugerud: Closeness beyond closeness: The technological facilitation of acousmatic hyperintimacy 14

    Bjørnar Sandvik: Sample, Slice, and Stretch! Four Innovative Moments in the History of Waveform Representation  14

    Antti Sakari Saario: “Yesterday’s Charm, Today’s Precision”: Martin B. Kantola and the design of a new ‘classic’ microphone (Nordic Audio Labs NU-100K)  15

    Session 2 B 14:00-15:40 (1D221)  16

    Florian Hollerweger: Audio beyond Demand: Creative Reinventions of the Broadcast Listening Experience 16

    Sven Ubik, Jakub Halak, Martin Kolbe & Jiri Melnikov: Comfortable playing together over distance  16

    Mattias Petersson: A new morphology – Strategies for innovation in live electronics performance  16

    Zachary Diaz: Signifyin(g) Producers: The Roland SP-404 and The Evolution of Live Instrumental Hip-Hop Performance  17

    Session 2 C 14:00-15:40 (1E207)  17

    Kirsten Hermes: Levelling up chiptune: nostalgic retro games console sounds for the ROLI Seaboard  17

    Ambrose Field & Ling Ding: Innovation and music business: a new approach for international partnership in music  18

    Egor Poliakov & Martin Pfleiderer and Christon-Ragavan Nadar: Analyze! Development and integration of software-based tools for musicological and music theoretical needs  18

    Christos Moralis: The ‘Performable Recordings’ model: Bridging the gap between the ‘Human’ and ‘Non-Human’ in Live Electronic Music Performance  19

    Session 3 A 16:00-17:15 (1C103 Lilla salen)  19

    Scott L. Miller & Carla Rees: Telematic Performance and Recording of Interactive Electroacoustic Chamber Music  19

    Henrik Langemyr: Music(al) Production: To Compose and Produce Musical for Recorded Medium: Based on the Perspective of Music, and Media Production  20

    Session 3 B 16:00-17:15 (1D221)  20

    Phil Harding: Transforming A Pop Song: The Journey of the Extended Club Remix  20

    M. Nyssim Lefford & Gary Bromham and David Moffat: From Intelligent Digital Assistant to Intelligent Digital Collaborator  21

    Brendan Williams: Creative Potentials for Dolby Atmos: Presenting the self-balancing acoustic ensemble  21

    Session 3 C 16:00-17:15 (1E207)  22

    Henrique Portovedo & Ângelo Martingo: Transforming Performance with HASGS: research-led artistic practice in augmented instruments  22

    Ambrose Field: Rethinking the relationships between space, performance and composition in notated acoustic composition: Quantaform Series  22

    Hans Lindetorp: Gesture-controlled synths with WebAudioXML  22

    Panel 2: How to get published? And Book releases Chair: Rob Toulson  23

    Keynote 3: Sven Ahlbäck, Christian Råsmark & Rob Toulson  23

    SUNDAY 2022-06-19 

    Welcome with music: Henry Mikkonen & Martin Åberg - 08:45 Lilla salen  23

    Panel 3: Exploring Dolby Atmos: Past Present and Future Chair: Daniel Pratt  23

    Session 4 A 10:20-12:00 - 1C103 (Lilla salen)  23

    Enric Guaus & Alex Barrachina, Gabriel Saber, Víctor Sanahuja, Josep Comajuncosas: Exploring a network setup for music experimentation  23

    Paul Thompson, Mcnally Kirk & Toby Seay: Multiple Takes: Multitrack Audio as a Musical, Cultural, and Historical Resource  24

    Jo Lord & Michail Exarchos: Dynamic meta-spatialisation: Narrative and recontextualisation implications of spatial stage stacking  24

    Stefan Östersjö, Thanh Thuy Nguyen & Matthew Wright: Yellow music in diaspora: Re-inventing the sound of pre-1975 record production in Sài Gòn  25

    Session 4 B 10:20-12:00 (1D221)  25

    Hans Lindetorp: Towards a standard for interactive music  25

    Jessica Edlom, Jenny Karlsson & Linda Ryan Bengtsson: Innovating music experiences – Creativity in pandemic times  25

    Alicja Sulkowska: Before Our Spring – towards the concept of intermedial authenticity in a curated K-pop industry. On the example of Kim Jonghyun’s “Blue Night Radio”  26

    Dave Fortune: Composing Without Keys: The LFO as a Composition Tool  27

    Session 4 C 10:20-12:00 (1E207)  27

    Mads Walther-Hansen & Anders Eskildsen: Forceful Action and Interaction in Non-Haptic User Interfaces for Music Production  27

    Charles Norton, Justin Paterson & Daniel Pratt: Musical connections and enhanced performance control, a strategy to reduce complexity  28

    Kjell Andreas Oddekalv: Rap as composite auditory streams: Techniques and approaches for layered vocal production in hip-hop and their aesthetic and philosophical implications  28

    Liucija Fosseli: Music Business Present and Future Innovations. Perspectives of international songwriters and producers working towards Chinas´market  29

    Keynote 4: Håkan Lidbo 13:00-13:50 - 1C103 (Lilla salen)  29

    Session 5 A 14:00-15:40 - 1C103 (Lilla salen)  29

    Stefan Östersjö & Jan Berg, Anders Hultqvist: A Deepened ‘Sense of Place’: ecologies of sound and vibration in urban settings and domesticated landscapes  29

    Andy Visser & Justin Paterson: HAPPIE: The Haptic Audio-Production Pipeline – A novel method for accomplishing audio-production tasks using haptic feedback within a Mixed Reality [MR] environment 30

    Jon Marius Aareskjold-Drecker & Ragnhild Brøvig-Hanssen: Vocal Chops: Balancing the Uncanny Valley 30

    Jacob Westberg: Ludonarrative Harmony: Music production through the lens of game design 31

    Session 5 B 14:00-15:40 (1D221)

    Thomas Bårdsen: Improving the republishing process of legacy music productions through documented source selection and reformatting  31

    Toivo Burlin: Mobile Classical Music – Recording, Innovation and Mediatization. Three Swedish case studies from the 1940’s to 2021  31

    David Thyrén, Jan-Olof Gullö, Per-Henrik Holgersson & Thomas Florén: Icebreakers and clusters within the Swedish music wonder  32

    Russ Hepworth-Sawyer, Rob Toulson & John-Paul Braddock: UDPi Mastering Protocol  32

    Session 5 C 14:00-15:40 (1E207)  33

    Mads Walther-Hansen: Music Production Entrepreneurship – Between Art and Business  33

    Thomas Arctaedius, Martin Q Larsson, Emilie Lidgard & Madeleine Jonsson Gill: Experiences from a Learning Lab – Cross Innovation in Music/Arts  33

    Daniel Pratt & Toby Seay: Time, place, and reflexivity: the recording space as an instrument 34

    Samantha Talbot: Song Worlds: Spontaneity, Intimacy, and Immersion. Music Video from Glencoe  34

    Concert & Paper presentation Henrik Frisk: Literate programming and documentation of artistic processes . Lilla salen 16:00   34

    Panel 4: Final reflections & Future perspectives 16:40  35

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  • 16.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Holgersson, Per-Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Florén, Thomas
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Johansson, Sören
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Gardemar, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    50 years of ”Smoke on the Water” in Music Education2022In: Nordic Network for Research in Music Education 2022 Conference - Book of Abstracts: 5–7 April, 2022, Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The song "Smoke on the Water" was recorded by the British rock group Deep Purple and first released in 1972. The song had a global reach and contributed to Deep Purple's success and fandom. Smoke on the Water is also relevant to music education. The basic guitar riff in the song is easy to learn and has attracted many, especially boys and young men, to play guitar. And even today, 50 years later, it is common for pupils to know this riff and gladly show it to their teachers when they start taking music lessons. The purpose of the research project is therefore to analyse, problematize, and describe how and why Smoke on the Water has been important and how the song has contributed to music education and to get young people interested in guitar playing. The study finds its theoretical ground in the American psychologist Jerome Bruner’s nine tenets, all highly relevant to research in music education, complemented by other theories in pedagogy, economics, sociology, musicology, and gender studies. The empirical design includes interviews with music teachers, music leaders, music students and musicians in different countries as well as interviews with some original members of Deep Purple. The analysis confirms that it is a very well-known riff and that students in higher music education, still today, in general know the song Smoke on the Water well. Many also state that they have played the song in ensembles of various kinds. Many have also sung it. But despite this, most of the participating students in higher music education were ignorant to the lyrics, also among the singers who stated that they had performed the song. These findings are empirically surprising and leads to new questions and in-depth analyses. Why are the lyrics, for the students, clearly subordinate to the musical content? This, despite that previous research clearly shows that the lyrics, for many average listeners, can be just as, or even more, important as the music itself. Is this an example of an unspoken hierarchical value system in higher music education? These results indicate a field of tension, regarding what is important in a musical performance and in a piece of music, like Smoke on the Water, between those who perform and those who listen. The example above shows how this study can be used to clear the smoke and visualize areas with development potential within higher music education. 

  • 17.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Holgersson, Per-Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Florén, Thomas
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Icebreakers and clusters within the Swedish music wonder2022In: Innovation in Music 2022 - Book of Abstracts: CONFERENCE PROGRAMME 17-19 June 2022 / [ed] Jan-Olof Gullö, Russ Hepworth-Sawyer, Rob Toulson, Justin Paterson, Stockholm, 2022, Vol. 01Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our ongoing project Searching for Sophia in Music Production, we explore factors that have been of great significance for the Swedish music wonder. In this paper, the aim is to identify important individuals in various genres that have paved the way for Sweden’s international success in music. One hypothesis we are working with is that a few innovative individuals who acted as "icebreakers" created smaller "clusters" centered around record companies that were highly influential. We present a selection of musical icebreakers and clusters that have successfully contributed to the Swedish music wonder: Stig "Stikkan" Anderson and Polar Music International AB, Bert Karlsson and Mariann Records, Ola H.kansson with Sonet and Ten Music Group, Robert von Bahr with BIS Records, Per-Olof "Pelle" Karlsson with Prim Records and Dag Volle "Denniz PoP" with Cheiron Studios. The study is methodologically based on literature studies and an inventory of source material as well as interviews with key people in Swedish music life. Theoretical perspectives include Jennifer Lena’s and Richard Peterson's (2008) model for the life cycles of genres, with stages of creation, development, conservation and stagnation, Paul Thompson's model for creativity in record production (2019) and Mats Trondman's theories of folk musical expression (1999). In addition, the analysis also uses theories in motivational research (Deci & Ryan, 2000) and entrepreneurial research with relevance to music and music industry development (Tschmuck, 2006; Östman 2018). Our analysis clearly shows that single theories cannot explain all essential parts of the Swedish music wonder. A combination of several theories and explanatory models is therefore needed. In our presentation, core issues around this are discussed.

  • 18.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Schyborger, Peter
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Core leadership skills in music production as learning outcomes in higher education2020In: MEIEA 2020 Summit, Washington: MEIEA , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT 

    During the last two decades, many Swedish songwriters and music producers have been internationally successful. At the same time, more and more students in Swedish higher education have studied music production and other courses with music in combination with design and new media technology. In this research project Searching for Sophia in music production we study how various aspects, including the development of the music and media industry as well as individual initiatives, have contributed to the growing Swedish export of music. The term Sophia refers to ancient Greek knowledge typology and is used to summarize the theoretical framework of the project. Sophia is understood as wisdom, or sagacity, and can be described as the ability to think and act using knowledge, experience, understanding and reason. Previous research clearly shows a variety of competences that are used and needed among musicians, music producers and others active in the art of music production.  Leadership is a very important aspect of music production and that's why we explore what we can learn from Denniz PoP's (1963-1998) leadership when he collaborated with his closest colleagues, including multiple award-winning songwriter/producer Max Martin.  The empirical source material includes interviews as well as radio and television programs, literature and an extensive inventory of Swedish music industry and consumer magazines. The results include a 7-step model for music production but also indicate that Denniz PoP's true expertise was his ability to make others in a team grow and perform well. And what best characterizes that form of expert knowledge can certainly be described in many ways. Core characteristics appear to be thoughtfulness combined with both creative ability and perseverance as well as a sense of order and discipline, aspects that may be very challenging to fully implement as learning outcomes in music production education.

  • 19.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    A comparative study of professional music production methods in theage of streaming2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Sweden is a small country, the Swedish music exports have been successful for many years. In our ongoing research project: Searching for Sophia in music production, we study how various aspects linked to music production may have contributed to the Swedish music industry´s international achievements. In this sub-study we focus on production methods available today, including digital production tools for music, and compare those with the production methods that were used before the age of streaming, in the late 1990s. Several previous studies focus on the technological development of digital music production tools. However, surprisingly little attention has been directed towards how such tools can affect professional musical creativity and productivity. This sub-study includes a case study of the Swedish music producer Dag Volle (1963–1998), also known as Denniz PoP. Volle had some unique music producer skills and also developed new innovative music production methods. Previous research has so far largely ignored his works despite his importance for the success of Swedish music exports. Denniz PoP is also remembered as mentor of Martin Sandberg [Max Martin] and therefore we analyze how the new tools and methods, that have been added over the years, may have affected the creative process of Sandberg and other successful Swedish music producers. The empirical material includes published sources of various kinds as well as interviews, conversations and written communication with some of Volle's closest associates who still are internationally active as music producers. The results indicate, firstly, that digital tools can help but also hinder creativity, and secondly, that several of the most important aspects of Volle's strategy as a music producer, for example to be driven by intrinsic motivation and by implementing music productions through collaborative processes, are still very relevant today - in the age of streaming.

  • 20.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Challenging Changes for Future Music Production2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there have been major changes in society on many levels. Such changes are of course of great importance to many urban residents. The changes we are referring to in this paper, are how people listen to music. On the streets and walkways in e.g. Stockholm, the capital of Sweden, large hordes of young men and women nowadays travel on electric scooters and almost everyone wears headphones and listens to music. Also on commuter trains, subways and buses, most of the travelers also wear headphones and listen to music. Thus, music is constantly present in these people's lives. But at the same time, music clubs and other music establishments, are often finding it increasingly difficult to achieve profitability due to a declining audience interest. Also traditionally successful music arenas such as the opera houses have problems to attract audiences, despite extensive and often very costly marketing. However, the big arena concerts with international artists still attract large crowds. This means that listening to music has evolved into something that usually happens entirely individually or on occasions in very large contexts, like e.g. at arena concerts. In this paper we highlight some of the challenges that young music producers face, due to the changing society, as they develop their artistic activities. The Swedish music industry has for many years been internationally successful and we present some core explanations of the success and also reflect on how societal development may need changes for future urban music development.

  • 21.
    Gullö, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Thyrén, David
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Music production in Swedish higher education: History and future challenges2019In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, ISSN 0081-9816, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 101, p. 185-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is a growing interest for music production in Swedish higher education, where many students today study the subject, we argue that music production may in many ways still be noticed as a blind spot in research. This paper explores how research and education in music production has emerged, in Sweden but also internationally, against the background of the ongoing research project Searching for Sophia in music production. This project investigates how various aspects linked to music production and music education have contributed to the Swedish music industry’s international achieve- ments. First, the development of music production courses and programmes in higher education is described, from the pioneering years in the 1980s until present. Next, we discuss key concepts in music production including the different phases of a music pro- duction and the role of the music producer. Thereafter we focus on four selected aspects of music production: creativity, innovation, motivation, and entrepreneurship. Further, future implications are discussed concerning the changes in how music is composed and produced, marketed, distributed, and how music is consumed today.

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    Music production in Swedish higher education History and future challenges Jan-Olof Gullö and David Thyrén 2019 STM–SJM vol. 101 (2019) 185-199
  • 22.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Musiikin aatehistoriaa2023In: Trio, ISSN 2242-6418, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 33-42Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In his book Music, Ideas, History: Texts 1990–2022 (in Finnish: Musiikki, aatteet, historia: Tekstejä 1990–2022), Matti Huttunen sheds light on the world of Western art music by showing how past historiographies of music have given it form and meaning. While grounded in Dahlhaus’ principles of structural history, Huttunen also challenges such models by allowing greater interpretive multidimensionality. He believes that by studying past writings about music, we can learn about music and ourselves, but his research also reflects a Nietzschean distance to one’s own time. In future accounts of Finnish musicology, Huttunen’s writings may provide a focus for a "long 20th century" of musical historiography.

  • 23.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Musikteoretiska begrepp: Alexander Rehding och Steven Rings, red., 2019. The Oxford handbook of critical concepts in music theory2021In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, ISSN 0081-9816, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Tuuri, Kai
    University of Jyväskylä, Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies.
    Music students’ accounts of their pleasant musical imagery: Aspects of voluntariness and narrative meaning-making2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Tuuri, Kai
    University of Jyväskylä, Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies.
    Narrative meaning-making in pleasant musical imagery2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    An Origin of Swedish Folk Music: A Case Study of the National Project Skansen 1896-18992023In: Folk-Music Practices and Polyphonic Nationalisms in Europe, 25–29 Sep 2023 / [ed] Felix Morgenstern, Graz, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The national project of Skansen was established at the end of the 19th century. Here, the Swedish is being created during a national romantic era by bringing folk culture from all provinces of the kingdom – to be displayed and brought to life at the capital’s open-air museum. The current research project focuses on the constitution of the Swedish when it comes to folk music. Skansen has, as an institution, become significant for knowledge production and the understanding of Swedish culture in several ways. Our contemporary understanding of Swedish folk music also originates from this time and the very event – the establishment of Skansen. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate how, and in what way, music becomes manifested and displayed at Skansen. One way to investigate this is to focus on a single fiddler – Johan Edlund from the Roslagen parish of Harg in Uppland, Sweden. Edlund, engaged as a fiddler 1896-1899, is portraited his first week at Skansen by the folk music collector Karl Peter Leffler. This book has, since its publication, been one of the oldest sources that later studies depart from. This research project, at hand, critically examines the origin of this manifestation of the Swedish. When it comes to Leffler’s transcribed music from Harg, it becomes clear that the music is not merely directly retrieved from the province to the capital. The presentation will show how national folk music is by far of a national origin but rather a conglomerate of international influences.

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  • 27.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Folkmusik till Skansen och Mazurkor till Harg: Folk music to Skansen and Mazurkas to Harg2023In: Nordic Network for Research in Music Education: Academic freedom and responsibility in music education and reserach, Örebro, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Just before the turn of the last century, the young and promising Swedish music ethnologist Karl Peter Leffler published Om Nyckelharpospelet på Skansen. In the writing, two detailed portraits are drawn of the fiddlers Johan Edlund and Jonas Skoglund, both of whom had been summoned from Uppland to contribute with folk music to the capital’s national project in Stockholm. The booklet has worked as the basis for several studies about the nyckelharpa, and folk music in general. The institution Skansen, is emerging as part of the Nordiska Museet under Artur Hazelius’ care. Here, the Nordic and the Swedish are being established during this national romantic era by bringing folk culture from all areas of the kingdom – to be displayed and brought to life at the capital’s outdoor museum. The current research project focuses on the constitution of the Swedish when it comes to folk music. Skansen has become significant for our knowledge of and how we understand Swedish culture. What kind of music was to become a part of the Swedish? One way to investigate this is to focus on a single fiddler – which in my case is one of the two fiddlers that Leffler highlights – Johan Edlund from the Roslagen parish of Harg in Uppland. The project, which is ongoing, tries to map the musical cultural geography of the 19th century and the Roslagen’s parish of Harg with the help of genealogical research using records of parish catechetical meetings, old maps, old national surveys from Nordiska Museet, photos, newspapers, and private correspondences. What was the musical life like for those who lived at this place at this time? What occasions, venues and contexts were music present in people’s lives? Where did the music stem from? How did they learn how to play and where did the instruments come from? The emerging picture around this fiddler, his playing and learning, shows, among other things, that it is not only Roslagen that brings music to the capital – musical influences also travel in the opposite direction. The patrons of the iron mill, järnbruken, of Uppland, often live with their families in the capital during the winter months where they enjoy musical salons as well as the city’s opera performances. They return to the estates during the spring and summer months where parties and dinners with ballroom dances offer the local fiddlers to play. At these events, the fiddlers seem to expand their repertoire with the novelty of the mill pattern drawn from the city’s social life. A picture of a give-and-take emerges, not only between the upper-class milieu and the common people but also between the capital city and the rural perishes as well as music genres in between.

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  • 28.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Stockholms Musikpedagogiska Institut.
    Mazurkor till Harg och folkmusik till Skansen2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Strax före förra sekelskiftet utkommer Karl Peter Leffler med en skrift om nyckelharpospelet på Skansen. I skriften tecknas två utförliga porträtt av spelmännen Johan Edlund och Jonas Skoglund, båda tillresta från Uppland enkom för denna uppgift. Institutionen Skansen, som växer fram under Artur Hazelius försorg, etablerar sig under denna nationalromantiska era genom att samla folklig kultur från riket och visa upp det svenska. Föreliggande forskningsprojekt fokuserar på en av dessa två spelmän, Johan Edlund, nybyggare på torpet Sundhagen vid Stockby i Hargs socken, Uppland. Projektet, som är pågående, försöker kartlägga Johans liv och leverne och vad som ligger bakom att han finns på Skansen 1896 och då beskrivs som en framstående spelman, en representant för den genuina folkkulturen. Vilka andra uppländska spelmän fanns att spela med och lära av i gårdarna och byarna kring Sundhagen? Hur ter sig musiklivet för de som bor på denna plats vid denna tid? Vilka tillfällen, spelplatser och sammanhang fanns att spela på och med vilka? Den bild som börjar växa fram kring denna spelman visar bland annat att det inte bara är Uppland som levererar musik till Stockholm – musikaliska influenser reser även i motsatt riktning. Brukspatronerna vid Hargs bruk vistas, med familj, i huvudstaden under vinterhalvåret där de njuter av musikaliska salonger såväl som stadens operaföreställningar. De återvänder till bruket under vår- och sommarmånaderna där fester och middagar med sällskapsdanser erbjuder traktens spelmän att spela. Vid dessa begivenheter verkar spelmännen utvidga sin repertoar med brukspatronens nyheter hämtade från stadens societetsliv. Fram växer en bild av ett givande och tagande, inte bara mellan stad och land utan även musikgenres emellan.

  • 29.
    Lillieström, Kristin
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Lättlästa noter2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 30.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Musikproduktion i olika medier2021In: Introduktion till medieteknik / [ed] Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson; Mikael Wiberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, 1, p. 143-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågor om vad musik gör med människor och vad människor gör med musik är fascinerande. Musik är ett av de viktigaste och största intressena i människors liv (Lilliestam, 2009). Därför är det lätt att förstå att människor under hela vår kända civilisation strävat efter att såväl spela och sjunga som att lyssna på musik. Sedan flera hundra år tillbaka finns väletablerade traditioner att kombinera musik med andra konstformer, som till exempel teater i form av opera eller dans genom balettföreställningar. Det finns också mycket gamla traditioner att använda musik i religiösa sammanhang, vid ceremonier eller festligheter av olika slag (Östman, 2018). Människors tankar om och värderingar av musik, samt i vilka syften musiken används påverkas och förändras av den omgivande kulturen. Och kulturer förändras och utvecklas. Dagens många metoder och tekniker för att producera, distribuera och konsumera musik är resultatet av en lång och omfattande medieteknisk utveckling (Burgess, 2014). Denna utveckling har haft mycket stor betydelse för hur musiken i vårt samhälle och de kulturer vi lever i har utvecklats. Samtidigt har vårt behov av musik efterfrågat och bidragit till utvecklingen av ny teknologi.

  • 31.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. Royal College of Music.
    Svahn, Maria
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Hölling, Josefine
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Collaborative music-making: special educational needs school assistants as facilitators in performances with accessible digital musical instruments2023In: Frontiers in Computer Science, E-ISSN 2624-9898, Vol. 5, article id 1165442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of research dedicated to Accessible Digital Musical Instruments (ADMIs) is growing and there is an increased interest in promoting diversity and inclusion in music-making. We have designed a novel system built into previously tested ADMIs that aims at involving assistants, students with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities (PMLD), and a professional musician in playing music together. In this study the system is evaluated in a workshop setting using quantitative as well as qualitative methods. One of the main findings was that the sounds from the ADMIs added to the musical context without making errors that impacted the music negatively even when the assistants mentioned experiencing a split between attending to different tasks, and a feeling of insecurity toward their musical contribution. We discuss the results in terms of how we perceive them as drivers or barriers toward reaching our overarching goal of organizing a joint concert that brings together students from the SEN school with students from a music school with a specific focus on traditional orchestral instruments. Our study highlights how a system of networked and synchronized ADMIs could be conceptualized to include assistants more actively in collaborative music-making, as well as design considerations that support them as facilitators.

  • 32.
    Ljung, Lucas
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Classical Music.
    Skräckromantiken genom Franz Liszt Ballad i b-moll2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här examensuppsatsen undersöks Franz Liszt och hans Ballad nr 2 i b moll. Genom detta ämnar jag ta reda på vad skräckromantiken egentligen var, vad som skapade den och om detta stycke är ett uttryck för tiden. Syftet är att undersöka stycket och försöka anknyta det till nutiden. Först gick jag noga igenom noterna och analyserade hur det musikaliska, dramaturgiska uttrycket hängde samman med orden, poemet. Efter att ha övat in själva melodin började ett sökande efter poemets berättelse i musiken, och en ny lång inövningsperiod där jag uttryckte historien i musiken, den som eventuellt fanns där men framför allt den egna tolkningen. Jag kom fram till att stycket var ett klart uttryck för det som kallas för skräckromantiken som många av verken Liszt och hans generationskollegor skapade.

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  • 33.
    Loimusalo-Lipiäinen, Nina
    et al.
    JAMK University of Applied Sciences & University of Jyväskylä.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Pianists’ music reading and styles of mental practice2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Lordelo, Carlos
    et al.
    Doremir Music Research AB.
    Benetos, Emmanouil
    Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, UK.
    Dixon, Simon
    Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, UK.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    Patrik, Ohlsson
    Doremir Music Research AB.
    Adversarial Unsupervised Domain Adaptation for Harmonic-Percussive Source Separation2020In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden;;KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    The melodic beat: exploring asymmetry in polska performance2021In: Journal of Mathematics and Music - Mathematical and Computational Approaches to Music Theory, Analysis, Composition and Performance, ISSN 1745-9737, E-ISSN 1745-9745, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some triple-beat forms in Scandinavian Folk Music are characterized by non-isochronous beat durations: asymmetric beats. Theorists of folk music have suggested that the variability of rhythmic figures and asymmetric metre are fundamental to these forms. The aim of this study is to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between melodic structure and asymmetric metre by analysing semi-automatically annotated performances. Our study considers archive and contemporary recordings of fiddlers' different versions of the same musical pieces: polska tunes in a local Swedish tradition. Results show that asym-metric beat patterns are consistent between performances and that they correspond with structural features of rhythmic figures, such as the note density within beats. The present study goes beyond previous work by exploring the use of a state-of-the-art automatic music notation tool in a corpus study of Swedish traditional music, and by employing statistical methods for a comparative analysis of performances across different players.

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  • 36.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Exploring sonification as a tool for folk music-dance interactions.2022In: Proceedings of the Second Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Sound, Movement, and the Sciences (SoMoS), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present ongoing work on the sonification of movements by dancers and players in Swedish folk music, with the aim to develop oral music theory tools for artistic and pedagogical purposes.

    An advantage of using sonification in the exploration of dance and music interaction is that it places dance movements within the same sensory domain as music - sound. In general, human beings are more accurate in perceiving time differences with auditory than visual stimuli, and the ability to listen to the dance movements can facilitate a more precise understanding of the complex temporal relations between movements and music. Sonifying dance movements extend traditional music and dance practices into an artificially created sonic world. With sounding dance movements, the roles in the interaction of dancers and musicians become entangled, which can allow new ways of artistic expression.

    This work aims at sonifying movement patterns in the dance in ways that 1) correspond to the embodied experience of the performers, 2) make the experience of how rhythms and meter interact in dancing and playing more tangible and, 3) allow for artistic explorations of performing with sonifications of dance.

    As a first step we explore sonifying motion capture data of dancers and musicians performing together and sonify movements that are relevant to the rhythmic and metrical patterns of the music and dance forms. This initial focus on recorded data facilitates a sound design that involves first-person perspectives. To this end, we invite expert dancers and musicians to contribute to the design process. We sonify using WebaudioXML to facilitate accessible interactions in this process, through a web interface, and we will present the insights from our ongoing design process. In future extensions we aim to explore using real-time sensors to allow live interactions between sonified dancers and musicians.

  • 37.
    Puurtinen, Marjaana
    et al.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Huovinen, Erkki
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ylitalo, Anna-Kaisa
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Cognitive Mechanisms in Temporally Controlled Rhythm Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements2023In: Music perception, ISSN 0730-7829, E-ISSN 1533-8312, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music-reading research has not yet fully grasped the variety and roles of different cognitive mechanisms that underlie visual processing of music notation; instead, studies have often explored one factor at a time. Based on prior research, we identified three possible cognitive mechanisms regarding visual processing during music reading: symbol comprehension, visual anticipation, and symbol performance demands. We also summed up the eye-movement indicators of each mechanism. We then asked which of the three cognitive mechanisms were needed to explain how note symbols are visually processed during temporally controlled rhythm reading. In our eye-tracking study, twenty-nine participants performed simple rhythm-tapping tasks, in which the relative complexity of consecutive rhythm symbols was systematically varied. Eye-time span (i.e., ‘‘looking ahead’’) and first-pass fixation time at target symbols were analyzed with linear mixed-effects modeling. As a result, the mechanisms symbol comprehension and visual anticipation found support in our empirical data, whereas evidence for symbol performance demands was more ambiguous. Future studies could continue from here by exploring the interplay of these and other possible mechanisms; in general, we argue that music-reading research should begin to emphasize the systematic creating and testing of cognitive models of eye movements in music reading. 

  • 38.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    A singing-style map?: Traditional folk singing in SwedenHow can it be described, and how can we teach it?2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation discusses features of the singing style in Swedish folk singing. This also leads to an attempt to describe some aspects of teaching folk singing style. In addition, it proposes a model for describing a singing style by combining particular features into a whole – a “singing style map” – as a compound concept. Individual features may be shared with other styles, allowing them to be combined into yet other singing styles. The presentation focuses on describing the features of the singing style from the singer's perspective and their usefulness for singing. It argues that, in folk singing, the singer’s voice quality and personality will always shine through even if stylistic features are shared within the style, which implies no contradiction. The features and the model describe both musical and technical aspects of singing, e.g. language as a tool for musical expression, voice mode, articulation, ornamentation, meter and phrasing, etc.

  • 39.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    'A Tight-rope Walk': How to describe artistic methods for improvisation in Folk Songs2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within artistic research, we try out and formulate new methods for artistic practice. But how do we, in the best way, disseminate those? How do we present artistic methods for musical creation? Visually? Through objects? Through narrative? With word as a text? Through the” act of singing”? These are intriguing questions; even if the research thrives in the artistic practice, we still want to disseminate our findings broadly so that other artists and interested parties can use and build knowledge on that. 

    This presentation will give examples of how to answer those questions by presenting findings from the project Folk Song Lab (supported by The Swedish Research Council 2019-2022), where, through collective improvisation, different artistic methods have been carved out and tested. Through art practice, the project has developed methods of singing from the perspective of flow parameters (Csikszentmihalyi) and ‘System 1’ (Kahneman). With a foundation from traditional singing and its stylistic and musical structure, a framework for creating anew has been formulated: a place, a time, and collective improvisation has been performed in a real-life performance. These findings and the different ways of disseminating them could be interesting not only within the field of folk singing or music but also be useful and give perspective in other genres and art forms. 

  • 40.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    ‘A Tight-rope walk’: Improvising Collectively with End Rhymes in the Style of the Swedish Medieval Ballads2022In: Rhyme and Rhyming in Verbal Art, Language and Song / [ed] Venla Sykäri, Nigel Fabb, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society , 2022, 1, p. 197-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens when contemporary folk singers improvise end rhymes in the style of the Swedish medieval ballads? In an ongoing project – Folk Song Lab – folk singers collectively improvised ballads with end rhymes using different methods. How do different improvising methods affect the result? Is it possible to acquire additional skills in rhyming via improvisation? Furthermore – how do the singer’s expertise, the number of participants in a session, and the setting in which improvisation occurs affect the result? Can improvisation sessions promote a higher degree of variation in not only the melody but also the storytelling? These questions are discussed through a presentation of results from two different collective improvising sessions. 

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  • 41.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Lä, Filipa (Contributor)
    Acoustic characteristics of kulning: A vocal calling technique from the Scandinavian herding tradition2020In: Musicae scientiae, ISSN 1029-8649, E-ISSN 2045-4147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    'An entity soluble in the mind': the cognitive framework of a singer2020Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 43.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Cognitive strategies in rhyming new ballads: an improvisatory approach2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the artistic research project “Folk Song Lab” (Rosenberg, 2019-2021) methods for oral composition and improvisation is tested from the concept of the song as being a cognitive framework both when it comes to tonality, melody and lyrics referring to Bronson’s quote: “What was it she had carried in her memory? Not a text, but a ballad: a fluid entity soluble in the mind, to be concretely realized at will in words and music.”(Bronson, 1969:71)

    By collective improvising sessions new songs are created in the project, both when it comes to melody and lyrics using rhyme as a vital ingrediency. The cognitive framework being useful both regarding to tonality and when it comes to text-formulas such as rhyme-pattern. The narrative starting point comes from structures that can be found in the Swedish medieval ballads and paring with different returning formulas (Jansson, 1999) such as “the grey horse”, “the green woods”, “the lily-white hand” by rhyming. In the Folk Song Lab project new ballads are improvised where the end-rhyme is a vital part. Also song-games that are promoting end-rhyme is tested in an improvisatory setting to enhance the participants internal knowledge in how to use rhyme as an tool for creating new songs.

    How does todays folk singer deal with rhyming as a tool? How can you learn the skills of rhyming? What are the benefits of using rhyme in an improvisatory setting?

    This paper presents findings from this ongoing research projects and compares these findings with traditional material. It will also present the viewpoint that improvisatory skills and creativity benefit from using formulas such as rhymes, and that internal knowledge could give room for strategies that promotes being freer in the moment (deManzano & Ullén 2012; Pinho et al 2016). This also reflects on the cognitive framework as useful when creating, and points back to quotation such as Albert Lord’s: “Our oral poet is composer. Our singer of tales is a composer of tales. Singer, performer, composer, and poet are one under different aspects but at the same time. Singing, performing, composing are facets of the same act.”(Lord, 2003).

  • 44.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Heartbeat and Breath: finding methods for describing the Swedish folk singing style and methods for teaching.2020In: Studia Fennica, Folkloristica, ISSN 1235-1946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents and discusses features of singing style in Swedish folk singing. This also leads to an attempt to describe some aspects of teaching folk-singing style. Also, it proposes a model for describing a singing style by combining particular features into a whole – a “singing style map” – as a compound concept. Individual features may be shared with other styles, allowing them to be combined into yet other singing styles. The paper focuses on describing the features of the singing style from the perspective of the singer, and on their usefulness for singing. It argues that, in folk singing, the singer’s personal voice quality and personality will always shine through even if stylistic features are shared within the style, which in itself implies no contradiction. The features and the model describe both musical and technical aspects of singing, e.g. language as a tool for musical expression, voice mode, articulation, ornamentation, meter and phrasing etc.

    The Department of Folk Music, KMH, in Stockholm has used this model, with its methods and feature set, as an aid for teaching Swedish folk singing from a holistic perspective for more than 30 years. Central to the model is the constant interplay between studying, describing and doing, in a fundamentally creative approach.

  • 45.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Higher education in Folk Music as an active part in today’s music development.: The example of ‘Kulning’2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Kulning’ – herding call - is a vocal expression, that originally was developed for communication between women and animal in the outdoor summer pastures of Sweden. It is a music that uses the landscape as a resonator, and in good conditions, it can be heard at a distance of 5 km or more. ‘Kulning ‘combines high pitch melody lines with various callings were the differences between voice modes are used for contrast. Due to its function for communication, it is improvised and adjusted to the situation in pitch, length and sounds, calling for long or short distances. In the mid 20th century, the art of kulning practice was declining, basically because the function of summer pasture, where it had its roots, not being in use any longer.

     

    However, the practice of ‘kulning’ has found other contexts for further use. Since the very start of folk music programs at The Royal College of Music in Stockholm, (KMH), ‘kulning’ has been taught as a standard part of voice knowledge for modern folk singers. In this new environment; pedagogic literature has been developed to aid the teaching and learning; new artistic work and collaborations have been based on the art of ‘kulning’, and composers have used ‘kulning’ in their music. ‘Kulning’ has also been researched and described in collaboration between scientific scholars and ‘kulning’ experts. Furthermore, elective courses have been developed within KMH open to both amateurs and professionals from other genres allowing them to learn this vocal expression.

    The platform of Folk music studies at KMH has been influential and a vital part for today’s development of ‘kulning’ practice, and today ‘kulning’ is hugely popular both as an art and as an amateur movement and is performed all over the world in a variety of contexts.

     

    This presentation will lay out some examples of this influence and development from the viewpoint of the folk music department at Royal College of Music in Stockholm (KMH) and discuss the importance of Higher Music Education being in the forefront to both keep and develop local traditions such as ‘kulning’.

  • 46.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Higher education in Folk Music as an ecosystem for today’s music development: The example of ‘Kulning’2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Kulning’, or herding call, was originally used by women as a powerful vocal working tool for communication with the cattle at the summer pastures in rural Scandinavia. 

    Today, ‘Kulning’ has transformed into an artistic expression in its own right that can be heard in experimental music, modern composition and arrangements, and even used as a tool for self-defence. ‘Kulning’- has become a popular movement amongst women as a powerful use of the woman's voice. At the Folk Music Department at KMH in Stockholm, we have created a platform for ‘Kulning’as an artistic expression using improvisation and vocal techniques in many different contexts and offer free courses that teach this vocal technique and music style, attracting hundreds of participants from various backgrounds over the years. 

    What role has this platform played, based on our artistic, pedagogic, and scientific research, in this transformation? How do we, as artistic practitioners, researchers, and teachers, act as agents of change and innovation within and outside of arts education, giving room to using your voice both as a musical expression and an expression of female power? How has this traditional use of the voice reoriented itself into new contexts, contributing to today's society? 

     References How do we formulate and teach this unique voice use? How do we use it in artistic practice? How is it used and thriving today both inside and outside performed on stage Women herds would use the power of their voices in a high pitch and improvise melodies and calls.

  • 47.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Improvising Folk Songs: The Folk Song Lab project2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A presentation of the findings in a research project called Folk Song Lab. Folk Song Lab acts as a platform for improvising folk songs in a collective setting in sessions starting from the cognitive framework (Rosenberg, 2019) of ballads, lullabies, folk chorales, and herding songs. It also takes its starting point from B. H. Bronson and A. Lord, indicating that the song only exists in the act of singing. One question asked in the project is what new skills can be acquired with this approach. Another question is how to use different memory systems, system one or system two (Kahneman, 2013) when improvising lyrics and melodies. It explores the possibility of creating artistic methods for flow, using play, risk, mimicry, reorientation, feedback, and real-life situations based on the findings of psychologist Csikszentmihalyi (1990), to nudge the participant to end up in the flow channel, being able to create more freely. A Folk song lab session is about improvising folk songs in a collective setting. Group size can vary from 5 to 40 participants, and a session lasts at least 40 minutes. In the session, everybody contributes by improvising and listening, taking turns, or improvising simultaneously. https://folksonglab.com 

  • 48.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    KEYNOTE: Folk Song Lab - from artistic research to practice and back again.: A loop within higher music education.2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can artistic research inspire development in higher music education, and how can the practice within higher music education loop back into further artistic research? Can a continuous interchange between artistic research and higher music education provide vitality to artistic research and higher music education? 

    This Keynote highlights these questions through the example of the project Folk Song Lab. 

    The Folk Song Lab project aims to develop and explore new models for collective improvisation in traditional folk singing. The aim is to find new models to revitalize and renew today’s folk singing within higher music education and beyond. 

  • 49.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Kulning – an ornamentation of the surrounding emptiness: about the unique Scandinavian herding calls2014In: Voice and Speech Review, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hard to describe in words both how kulning sounds and how you do it. The starting point for the vocal technique is that you want to be heard and to communicate outdoors with the help of the voice. As it has mainly been women who have traditionally worked on the fäbod (summer grazing pasture with small buildings for people, pets, dairy products, and animal feed), the use of the voice has also evolved according to the strengths and limitations of the female voice.

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  • 50.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    LISA BOUDRÉS SÅNGLIGA OCH MELODISKA GESTALTNING I TRE VISOR: en analys av ett folkligt sångsätt1986Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

     Syftet med uppsatsen har varit att försöka beskriva Lisa Boudrés (1866-1952) utförande av tre inspelade visor, både vad gäller sånglig och melodisk gestaltning. Ett annat syfte har varit att försöka beskriva det karaktäristiska för svensk vokal folkmusik av den äldre typ som dessa tre visor representerar. Jag har velat göra en djupanalys av en vissångerska, utan att göra anspråk på att säga något generellt om folklig sång i Sverige. Jag hoppas dock vid ett senare tillfälle kunna göra en jämförande studie av flera vissångare.

    Min avsikt med uppsatsen har inte varit att närmare beskriva de etnologiska, historiska, funktionella eller sociologiska aspekterna på folklig vissång eller i förhållande till Lisa Boudrés sång, utan dessa aspekter beskriver jag bara kort och i den mån jag har ansett att de har betydelse för förståelsen av det ämne uppsatsen behandlar.

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