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  • 1.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Aesthetics, Interaction and Machine Improvisation2020In: Organised Sound, ISSN 1355-7718, E-ISSN 1469-8153, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from the artistic research project Goodbye Intuition(GI) hosted by the Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo, thisarticle discusses the aesthetics of improvising with machines.Playing with a system such as the one described in this article,with limited intelligence and no real cognitive skills, willobviously reveal the weaknesses of the system, but it will alsoconvey part of the preconditions and aesthetic frameworks thatthe human improviser brings to the table. If we want theautonomous system to have the same kind of freedom wecommonly value in human players’ improvisational practice,are we prepared to accept that it may develop in a directionthat departs from our original aesthetical ambitions? Theanalyses is based on some of the documented interplay betweenthe musicians in a group in workshops and laboratories. Thequestion of what constitutes an ethical relationship in this kindof improvisation is briefly discussed. The aspect of embodimentemerges as a central obstacle in the development of musicalimprovisation with machines.

  • 2.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    ArtDoc - an Experimental Archive and a Tool for Artistic Research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ArtDoc is an experimental database and archive for primarily

    documentation of artistic content. It attempts to address the question

    of the diculty of documenting artistic practice in a manner that makes

    visible the processes in action. The background to this project is discussed

    and the theory behind the development of open works. Though

    ArtDoc is still under construction the foundation of the archive is presented.

    Finally some thoughts on the future of digital documentation

    systems is discussed.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Elif Balkir: Étude comparative des approches créatrices et technologiques au Groupe de Recherches Musicales à Paris et à l’Elektronmusikstudion à Stockholm 1965–19802020In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, ISSN 0081-9816, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 102Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Elif Balkirs avhandling.

  • 4.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Ett utvidgat musikaliskt fält2020In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, ISSN 0081-9816, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 102Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Marina Pereira Cyrinos avhandling An inexplicable hunger: flutist)body(flute (dis)encounters lades fram vid Göteborgs universitet den 3 april 2019. Opponent var Catherine Laws, pianist och musikvetare vid University of York. Avhandlingen består av en bok och hela tio videor som på olika sätt dokumenterar de fem verk som avhandlingen innefattar. Boken är uppdelad i två delar varav den första fungerar som ett slags kappa, en på ett sätt fristående essä, som inte desto mindre ringar in forskningen. Den andra delen diskuterar de konstnärliga verken under rubrikerna Nocttuidae, Noctuoidea, Is she?, An aeroelastic flutter, Inside-out pastoral, Check out my w/holes.

  • 5.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Exploring an ethics of instruments2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this lecture-recital Tresch and Dolans's notion that the material aspects, mediations and the telos of an instrument can provide grounds for an analysis of its  /ethics/ is discussed. It may first appear odd to speak of ethics in relation to objects such as a musical instruments, and this is an attempt to revisit the origin of this idea and critically examine it by briefly discussing its roots in Foucault's /History of Sexuality part 2/. In the presentation a performance on the /Dataton 3000/, a modular synthesizer and audio mixer designed in Sweden in the 1970's, is used to illustrate how these ideas can be understood and critically assessed. To attempt to understand the qualities and the particularities of this instrument a wide range of parameters need to be considered, including those related to the context in which it was originally created. Yet, development of performance practices may also happen by simply disregarding such information and treat the instrument primarily as a vehicle for the creativity of its player. In the attempt to understand the dialectical relation between staying true to the instrument's origin (according to some principle) and allowing new practices to be formed on top of old, or by simply bypassing existing and/or forgotten practices, there is a need for a method. Though the notion of an ethics of instruments as sketched out by Tresch and Dolan appears to be useful, it also raises questions related to the agency of the instrument in a network af agents formed through performance and through the interfaces that emrge in the playing.

  • 6.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Forskning som undervisning: om forskning och undervisning på konstnärliga högskolor2020In: Skandinavisk seminar i KU-basert musikkutdanning / [ed] Ingfrid B. Nyhus, Oslo: NMH, CEMPE , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna presentation kommer jag diskutera ett samarbete mellan KMH (Kungl. Musikhögskolan) och KTH (Kungl. Tekniska Högskolan) som initierades 2016. En av målsättningarna var att bygga upp en forskningsmiljö i nära interaktion med grundutbildningen samt att möjliggöra en gemensam forskarutbildning. Programmet vände sig till anställda lärare på KMH som hade intresse för forskning. De lärare som blev antagna fortsatte arbeta på 50% som lärare samtidigt som de följde forskarutbildningen på KTH. Samtliga fyra doktorander hittills har involverat sina studenter i sin forskning, som en integrerad del av kurserna de undervisar. Studenterna har på så vis bidragit till forskningen vilket i sin tur har lett till en acceptans, forskningsmedvetenhet och intresse hos studenterna. Härutöver har det påverkat kusrsplaneutveckling inom de ämnen som det rör.

    Den konstnärliga forskningen i musik har haft en stark utveckling i Skandinavien under de senaste 20-30 åren. En anledning till framgången är att det relativt begränsade antalet platser har gått till etablerade musiker. Att studenter går från grundutbildning till forskarutbildning direkt är ovanligt, om ens möjligt. Fördelen med detta är att forskarutbildningen inte har behövt koncentrera sig på den konstnärliga delen, utan istället mer på hur detta kan gestaltas som forskning. Nackdelen är att kopplingen mellan grundutbildning och forskning inte har beaktats i tillräckligt stor utsträckning. Forskarutbildningen har skett i ett spår för sig och grundutbildningen har inte sett sig ha behov av den typen av kunskapsbildning som doktoranderna ofta intresserar sig för. Detta skapar flera utmaningar, inte minst som den konstnärliga akademin fortfarande på vissa ställen befinner sig i en konfliktliknande relation till det akademiska och akademiseringen ses som ett hot. Lösningen på den situationen är inte att akademisera det som ännu inte är akademiserat. Istället bör vi sträva efter att å ena sidan göra forskningsresultat användbara i konstnärlig undervisning, och å andra sidan skapa miljöer i vilka även konstnärlig praktik i, och för sig själv, ses som potentiella forskningsresultat.

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  • 7.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Före eller efter: om konstnärlig erfarenhet och kunskapi konstnärlig praktik2021In: Konstens kunskap / [ed] Fredrik Nyberg & Niclas Östlind, Göteborg: ArtMonitor , 2021, p. 177-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Konstnärlig forskning har haft en dynamisk och positiv utveckling de senaste tjugo åren,men vägen är fortfarande ojämn och lite knagglig: På ett bredare plan finns det relativtlite kunskap om vad det egentligen är, även på vissa konstnärliga högskolor och likasåfinns det fortfarande frågor kring vad den kan bidra med. Man kan förvisso fråga sig omkunskapen om till exempel den sociologiska eller antropologiska forskningens metoderoch resultat i allmänhet är större, eller om det finns en bredare insikt i på vilket sättforskning i, säg, fysik bidrar till samhällets utveckling. Dessa exempel på forskningsdis-cipliner är dock uppenbart politiskt och kulturellt mer etablerade på ett sätt som denkonstnärliga forskningen inte är, varför okunskapen är ett större problem i dessa fält äni andra.

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  • 8.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs, but so is heaven2017In: Seismograf, ISSN 2245-4705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, whenwe think of musical performance inWestern art music, it is easy to take

    for granted the division of labor between, for example, musician and composer. However,

    music has obviously been produced for many thousands of years without there

    being a need to compose and write it down before playing it. Most genres of music have

    sustained and developed without this split between creator and performer. In genres

    where improvisation play an important role the musician sometimes embodies both the

    creative act and the interpretative–simultaneously. In musics built on aural traditions

    the composed component is integrally bound to the musician. However, as advanced

    and standardized technologies for systematic notation of music were developed in Europe

    the role of the musician slowly began to evolve into two, often separate parts: one

    part primarily responsible for the construction of music (composer), and one part primarily

    responsible for the performance of it (musician). There is no doubt that composition

    and notation are extraordinarily ecient means to structure, communicate and

    preserve musical ideas and it is fair to assume that the development that led to the division

    of labor loosely sketched here participated in the advancement ofWestern music

    into new aesthetic areas.

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  • 9.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Identity formation through music in diaspora2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video essay addresses the role of Nhac Vang (Yellow Music) - a form of Vietnamesepopular music - in identity formation among Vietnamese women in diaspora. Several importantstudies have been made of the role of music in Vietnamese immigrants (Cunningham &Nguyen, 1999; Reyes, 1999), but not specifically in Scandinavia. Cunningham & Nguyen(1999), in a study of the role of music and media in the formation of cultural identity amongVietnamese immigrants in Australia note “the felt need to maintain pre-revolutionary Vietnameseheritage and traditions; find a negotiated place within a more mainstreamed culture; or engagein the formation of distinct hybrid identities around the appropriation of dominant Westernpopular cultural forms” (p. 77).Building on interviews with Vietnamese women in diaspora in Scandinavia, the essayconstitutes initial preliminary results of Nguyen’s postdoctoral project. The project seeks adeeper understanding of the role of music in the negotiation of identity among Vietnameseimmigrants. The music in the video essay is composed through remote interaction betweenmembers of The Six Tones and other Vietnamese performers. The making of the music and thevarious constraints that the format of networked performance imposes is also discussed as partof the proposed paper.

  • 10.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Intercultural Collaboration through Networked Performance2020In: / [ed] David Hebert, Bergen, 2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to affect individual musicians, ensembles and concert institutions, streaming technology has become a central vehicle through which musicians and audiences can meet.  But this forced move to digital presence also suggests new possibilities, beyond the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. This paper discusses how networked performance, a format which has engaged artists for decades as an artform in its own right, may also contribute to the sustaining of cultural heritage among migrant/minority communities as well as to the development of innovative intercultural artistic practices. Building on the experience of our group, The Six Tones, as well as on research carried out by Roger Mills (2019) and Ximena Alarcón Diaz, we wish to develop a more robust understanding of the possibilities, and the limitations, that networked technology affords. The central source of our own work is drawn from Musical Transformations, an ongoing project which studies the intersection between traditional and experimental music in globalized society. We address the role of social interaction in the practice for intercultural collaboration, developed by The Six Tones since 2006, and discuss how such interactions are made difficult when collaborating through mediation of digital technology. In this context we believe that it is possible to also study what the limitations that the technologies impose and what the nature of these limitations amount to. Such a study may be useful also in other areas of digital interaction. Qualitative analysis of video documentation from rehearsals and performances constitute the foundation for the study. In the presentations we further discuss the projected creation of a scene for intercultural exchange at Manzi Art Space in Hanoi, with reference to the first networked performance carried out live on a scene in Hanoi on July 12, 2020, curated by The Six Tones at Manzi. This project situates the discussion even more immediately in the current developments of music culture at the time of the pandemic. The presentation, by the four authors, is supplemented with video from networked performances, as well as interviews with the group and guest performers documented on video. 

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  • 11.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    L’improvisation et le moi: écouter l’autre2021In: PaaLabResArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    Écouter l’autre : cette phrase soulève un nombre incalculable de questions. Apprendre à écouter ceux avec qui l’on joue est un des aspects essentiels de la pratique de l’improvisation, mais, par expérience, je pense que la tâche la plus difficile est de s’écouter soi-même. Écouter l’autre tout en jouant ne veut évidemment pas dire qu’il faille complètement renoncer à sa propre identité, ni devenir comme l’autre, mais s’accorder ou entrer en résonance avec l’autre. C’est dans l’interaction entre plusieurs personnes (deux ou plus) que se déroule l’improvisation ouverte et sans attaches, dans un jeu qui se situe entre s’ajuster à ce que fait l’autre et s’écouter soi-même. Dans cet article, ma pratique artistique au sein d’un groupe suédois-vietnamien The Six Tones sert de contexte pour aborder quelques aspects de la question du moi [self] et de l’autre, en utilisant trois concepts, chacun exerçant une profonde influence sur le moi [self] : la liberté, l’habitude et l’individualité. Je n’aborderai ces concepts, si vastes et profonds, que dans un contexte relativement limité et tourné vers la pratique.

  • 12.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    On the intuition of a machine2020In: Research CatalogueArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     One of the great challenges of any research project that spans over several years is to keep the project contained and avoid it from going off in directions less useful for answering the questions posed. Yet, it has to be open enough to allow for unexpected findings in the fringes of the practice. This is especially true of artistic research projects, as they have a tendency to be interdisciplinary and sometimes broad-brushed, which in fact may be seen as one of the qualities of the field. Furthermore, the artistic practice and its contexts, which may sometimes itself be difficult to delimit, are at least at the outset the original bounds of an artistic research project. The difficulties, however, remains to know when a trajectory should be given up or stayed with: When is this particular issue exhausted in the context of the project? It is through method development that a field of research practice can evolve, and we, as artists and researchers, can learn to become better at making those decisions.

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  • 13.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    On the self and ethics in musical improvisation: What can we learn?2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been many attempts to draw wide-ranging conclusions on the knowledge offered by the specific type of musical practice that is summarized by the word improvisation. The fact that we in the West tend to specify improvisation as the exception to score-based music, a norm situated at the center of Western high culture, is odd considering that most music was based on improvisation long before musical notation was invented. This view contributes to the understanding of improvisation as a practice that deviates from the rule, a fringe alternative on the outskirts of other, more dominant musical practices. This is further emphasized by the structural and economic differences between, for example, free improvised music and Western classical music.

    At the same time, the discussion concerning improvisation has often excluded many non-western types of music that are improvisatory by nature, and instead mainly focused on its practice in Western musical styles. For that reason, I believe that the stylistic delimiter improvisation can be problematic. In this presentation, I will mainly discuss improvisation as a possible catalyst for individual, as well as more general knowledge formation closely related to ethics. I will introduce ideas about how improvisation can be part of a method with which different values may be proposed. Values that may offer an interesting opposition, or tension, to those proposed by the capitalist structures currently dominating the world. These are not necessarily 'better' but can help to reveal how a multiplicity of perspectives can be applied to questions concerning what it means to make good decisions, and to be a good human being.

    The point I will attempt to pursue is how ethics in artistic practices, that is, the moral values that are expressed through artistic practices in music, specifically improvisation, may complement traditional views on ethics. Furthermore, the hypothesis is that the results of such exploration may contribute to the understanding of ethics in a more general sense. In turn, this could potentially have an impact on how improvisatory practices are esteemed in contemporary Western societies. The notion of the Care of the Self, as discussed in Michel Foucault's Volume Three of the History of Sexuality, is used as a method to approach this complex area.

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  • 14.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Shared Listenings: Methods for Transcultural Musicianship and Research2023 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Element demonstrates how a combination of stimulated recall and collaborative autoethnographic strategies can be applied to artistic and scholarly work at the intersection of ethnomusicology and practice-led-research. The authors relate recently collected material from fieldwork in Vietnam to the long-term method development within the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones, of which three authors are the founding members. The discussion centers around the inter-subjective forms of stimulated recall analysis, developed through the creative work of this innovative intercultural music ensemble. The aim of this project is to create a decolonized methodology—for both music performance and research—and it provides a detailed account of this method development starting in 2006. Furthermore, the authors discuss how this practice was successfully shared with three master performers in the south of Vietnam as part of a collaborative project in 2018–2019. 

  • 15.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Szyber och konstnärlig forskning: The anatomy of a disputation2020In: Öresund Collegium for Artistic Research, Teaterhögskolan i Malmö, 2020Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    The Sound for Themselves: Interview of Jacob Kirkegaard by Henrik2023In: Traces of Sound., Lund: Publications from the Sound Environment Centre at Lund University , 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Traces of Sound2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even unheard sounds can be perceived and not only the ear hears sound, so does the body. The thing that constitutes sound, changes in air pressure, happens obviously also when we cannot hear it, and even if we listen, we may not hear it. From a physical point of view there is little difference between the frequencies that fall outside the audible range and those that fall within it, both are functions of changes in air pressure. Sounds that have not yet been heard, those that are imagined, and those that have long been silenced are part of our listening activity, perceptually as real as the physical.

  • 18.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Traces of Sound: Introduction2023In: Traces of Sound, Lund: Publications from the Sound Environment Centre , 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Elberling, Anders
    Machinic propositions: artistic practice and deterritorialization2019In: Aberrant nuptials: Deleuze and Artistic Research 2 / [ed] P. Guidici and P. de Assis, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Elblaus, LudvigRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Music and Installation Programme: The Sound and Music Computing Conference 20232023Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 21.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Hebert, David
    Universitet i Bergen.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    ÖStersjö, Stefan
    Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Intersubjective knowledge through artistic research: approaches to transcultural dialogue through stimulated recall2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this panel discussion we address the theme of  “Working together” in relation to the following question: How can intersubjective understanding and new knowledge be drawn from artistic collaboration? The presentation explores the method of stimulated recall, such as it has been used and developed within the work of the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones.

    The group was created in 2006 and in 2009, the group took part in their first artistic research project, (re)thinking Improvisation. As part of their work in the project, the group studied their interactions through stimulated recall, using video documentation of rehearsals and performances as a source. The material recorded in 2009 has been coded and re-coded in several periods across the years, and most recently in 2019, when creating a new analysis of the working process for a chapter in Stefan Östersjö’s book Listening To The Other (2020).

    The structure of the panel is based on sharing materials from earlier work of the group, in the form of video clips and parts of analysis produced. We provide a background to qualitative analysis of video through stimulated recall in music research, but the panel first and foremost aims to create a dialogue with the participants in the conference on these perspectives on knowledge and methods in artistic research. Video clips from previous analysis and earlier coding and annotations, as well as more extended analytical approaches will be presented, also by the participants in the panel again viewing some of these source videos and reflecting on them, thereby enacting a stimulated recall session. 

    How can the collaborative methods that we developed through (re)thinking Improvisation be understood, in terms of the broader context of music scholarship, as innovative forms of knowledge development? Since the time of Pythagoras and Plato, scholars have theorized ways that the communicative nature of musical sound might best be explained. Even since Medieval times, empirical studies of music, such as those documented by Al Farabi in Kitab al-Musiqa al-Kabir (The Great Book of Music), were deemed sufficiently important to constitute a distinct field, ultimately known as musicology, resulting in a division of music studies into musica practica and musica theoretica with its bifurcation of performers and theorists. From the late 19th century, many empirical researchers emphasized behavioral approaches, with a focus on documentation of the array of precise measurable actions connected to musical activity. Such approaches have produced many important insights, yet do not take into account the perceptions and experiences of performers. Other kinds of researchers, such as ethnographers and phenomenologists, made extensive use of interviews, sometimes in combination with observations. Interviews lead to insights of a different kind, but are notoriously unreliable for an array of reasons, including personal biases and tainted interpretations, self-censorship, memory issues, and researcher effects. The historical division of musica practica and musica theoretica started to be directly challenged in the mid-20th century with the rise of the “bimusicality” movement among ethnomusicologists, and – a few decades later later—the “artistic research” movement among academic artists of all kinds, as artistic and academic projects were increasingly intertwined, resulting in new perspectives regarding what counts as musical knowledge. It is within the context of artistic research and ethnomusicology that our project has introduced applications of a method known as video stimulated recall. Stimulated recall first began entering musical study as a method that was pioneered in the field of psychology. By presenting participants with video-recorded actions to reflect upon, stimulated recall as a method seeks to improve the richness and precision of interviews, so their capacity to produce deep insights is greatly enhanced by reference to automatically recorded behaviors. Depending on how it is defined, “stimulated recall” may be understood as associated with the use of images in therapy sessions as part of psychological research as early as the 1950s. However, in music research stimulated recall is typically understood today as a strategy that employs the use of audio or audiovisual recordings as a basis from which to stimulate precise discussion of musical techniques.

    How exactly have previous music-related studies made new insights by pioneering the application of video stimulated recall strategies, and what has our project done to extend further with methodological innovation? As recent as 2009, a study in the international journal Music Education Research was able to identify previous studies in education that used stimulated recall method, but not any in music (Rowe, 2009). However, across the past decade various music studies have made use of video stimulated recall methods, including from the very year that Rowe’s study was published (Heikinheimo, 2009), a significant proportion of which are from the Nordic countries (e.g. Falthin, 2015; Heikinheimo, 2009; Soderman & Folkestad, 2004, etc.). Moreover, while the term “video stimulated recall” was not explicitly used at the time, some innovative studies of musical interaction in jazz from the perspective of communication theory were developed as early as the late 1980s by Bastien & Hostager (1988, 1992, 1996) that might best be understood as pioneering the use of stimulated recall methods in music. In these studies, jazz musicians were videotaped in the course of improvised performance and later asked to explain the processes observed. More recently, notable studies have included doctoral dissertations in Europe (Falthin, 2015) on meaning-making processes among young music students, and in North America (Bell, 2013) on interaction with technologies in the music recording process. Articles using this method in major journals have examined such topics as the views of expressive performance among young music students (Meissner, Timmers & Pitts, 2020) and how music teachers and students view the role of creativity in music performance (James, Wise, & Rink, 2010). There have thus far been relatively few stimulated recall studies of advanced musicians and situations in which musicians are negotiating between different musical traditions across a cultural divide, yet stimulated recall methods promise insights in these areas as well.

     

    Our work may be among the first to use stimulated recall methods to examine intercultural music making, although not the first to use these strategies for study of other aspects of music making nor intercultural issues. In fact, there are previous examples of this method being used for cross-cultural research in Vietnam, although not in the field of music (Nguyen & Tangen, 2017). Rather, what makes the approach used in our study unique is that the robust capabilities of stimulated recall strategies are used to explicate complex experiences and processes are brought to bear on aesthetic decision making associated in both traditional and experimental musicianship in the context of an intercultural project. In such a way, the work of the Six Tones in this project has extended significantly on previous methods and research findings. Our initial motivation for developing the methods for analysis of our artistic practice was the challenge we faced as a group of musicians involved in intercultural collaboration. In The Six Tones, musicians from traditional Vietnamese music would engage with musicians from the west, negotiating musical practices as the practice is unfolding. At the early stages of this process the language barrier highlighted the different perspectives and the need to make these perspectives a central aspect of the artistic process. At the bottom line, the challenge we experienced was rooted in how our listening, as professional musicians, is socio-culturally situated, and therefore biased. An extra effort is therefore necessary to move beyond stereotypical interaction, and the aim of the method we developed was to accommodate new forms of listening that engender more dynamic artistic exchange. 

    As developed for artistic research purposes by the group, it would be a mistake to see the method of stimulated recall as primarily aiming for the production of discursive analytical layers, i.e. the coding and annotations. In the practice of The Six Tones, it is instead the ways in which the shared listening, enhanced through the method, has created a new listening practice within the group: a transformed listening. The process of verbalizing and signifying the experience of repeated listening is an important part of the process, but not the final goal. Rather, it is this transformed listening, and the ability to establish modes of interaction with musical Others beyond cultural prejudice, which has been the central ambition. The panel discusses how such a listening practice emerged within the group, but also gives examples of how such forms of listening has subsequently been shared with other musicians in intercultural collaboration. Our reference is the work carried out in the ongoing research project Musical Transformations, involving master performers in a tradition in the south of Vietnam, and how they describe experiences of transformed listening, through the process of intercultural music making, and the use of stimulated recall. 

    We understand a musician’s listening as embodied, and therefore situated in the interaction with their instruments, and other musical tools, such as tonal systems and forms of notation. A transformed performance practice can be seen as evidence of a transformed listening. We also argue that novel modes of listening can be evidenced in the interaction between musicians in performance. When artistic research is manifested in performance, its outcomes must also be assessed through its force and effect in an art world. In what ways do the artistic outcomes create difference? 

  • 22.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Lunds Universitet, Musikhögskolan i Malmö.
    Found in translation2019In: Seismograf (https://seismograf.org)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This audio paper is an exploration of part of the process of making Drinking (2014) -

    a piece for voice, Vietnamese zither .àn tranh, and electronics. The composition is developed

    from composer William Brook’s project After Yeats in which Brooks provides

    an instruction describing a collaboration between a performer and a composer. After

    Yeats is not itself a composition, but should rather be seen as a method with which a

    composer and a performer may realize a score (Brooks 2013). At the outset the chosen

    poem–A Drinking Song by William B. Yeats in a translation to Vietnamese, the native

    language of Nguyen Thanh Thuy–was recited, and it was the sonic trace of the reading

    that was the point of departure for the composition Drinking. In this case the meaning

    of the words is of less signicance than the sound of the reading. After Yeats is in

    some ways an attempt to revive the tradition of chanting poems to a lyre accompaniment

    common in the practice of Yeats and his contemporaries. Henrik Frisk, a Swedish

    composer, takes the recording of the reading and, according to the instructions in After

    Yeats,works to compose the piece according to the implications of the declamation from

    Nguyen’s reading. According toMarcel Cobussen, "listening also involves an opening of

    the senses that is not necessarily enfolded in conscious meaningfulness, by sense. It also

    takes place outside, before or beyond sense; it also refers to a sense that operates outside,

    before or beyond signication" (Cobussen 2008: p. 131). The emotional responses that

    arise from engaging in artistic practice operate in similar ways to how Cobussen situates

    listening in a space beyond signication. They may be communicated and sometimes

    brought to the fore, but they always have a tendency to appear mysterious, arcane and

    ephemeral. The inuence by the many diferent kinds of agents that may be found in

    Brooks’ meta-composition makes the creative process daunting to understand but is also

    wrapped around the idea of what is to be found outside, before and beyond.

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  • 23.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Rikard, Lindell
    The Unfinder: Finding and reminding in electronic music2023In: Proc. of the 16th International Symposium on CMMR, Tokyo, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we examine how we as composers of electronic musicorganize our material, files, samples, settings, and compositions, and how exist-ing technologies fails to meet our expectations. This text is based on a pseudo-autobiographical pilot study, where we and one other composer wrote journalnotes of a preparation for an improvisation based on previous works or other ma-terial. The notes were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis that resultedin six themes: Storage media; Date, time, and remembering; Matured material;Structure, metadata, and collection of material; Associations; and Tool. Despitethe enormous amounts of storage capacity available, the practice we use today webear similarities to Barreau and Nardi’s [1] nearly 30-year-old article Finding andReminding. However, current operating systems were originally designed primar-ily to handle text files, the file system user interface has shortcomings in allowingfor the kind of diversity and plethora of methods for storing and finding audiofiles in current music practices. Our study indicates that in order to support theway electronic music composers work, we need a usable, dynamic, plain, andtransparent storage and material retrieval system.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    ÖStersjö, Stefan
    Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Hebert, David
    UiB.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Musical Transformations: Networked Performance in Intercultural Music Creation2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the worldwide lockdown affecting individual musicians and concert halls, streaming technology has become a central vehicle through which musicians and audiences can meet.  But this forced move to digital presence also suggests new possibilities, beyond the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. This paper discusses how networked performance, a format which has engaged artists for decades as an artform in its own right, may also contribute to the sustaining of cultural heritage among migrant/minority communities as well as to the development of innovative intercultural artistic practices. Building on the experience of our group, The Six Tones, as well as on research carried out by Roger Mills (2019) and Ximena Alarcón Diaz, we wish to develop a more robust understanding of the possibilities, and the limitations, that networked technology affords. The central source of our own work is drawn from Musical Transformations, an ongoing project which studies the intersection between traditional and experimental music in globalized society. We address the role of social interaction in the practice for intercultural collaboration, developed by The Six Tones since 2006, and discuss how such interactions are made difficult when collaborating through mediation of digital technology. In this context we believe that it is possible to also study what the limitations that the technologies impose and what the nature of these limitations amount to. Such a study may be useful also in other areas of digital interaction. Qualitative analysis of video documentation from rehearsals and performances constitute the foundation for the study. In the paper, we further discuss the projected creation of a scene for intercultural exchange at Manzi Art Space in Hanoi, with reference to the first networked performance carried out live on a scene in Hanoi on July 12, 2020, curated by The Six Tones at Manzi. This project situates the discussion even more immediately in the current developments of music culture at the time of the pandemic. The presentation, by the four authors, is supplemented with video from networked performances, as well as interviews with the group and guest performers documented on video. 

    The Six Tones and Phạm Công Tỵ play an experimental version of Vọng cổ, a traditional tune from the south of Vietnam. The Six Tones are Nguyễn Thanh Thủy (who plays Đàn tranh), Ngô Trà My (who plays Đàn bầu), Stefan Östersjö (Vietnamese electric guitar) and Henrik Frisk (electronics). 

  • 25.
    Frisk, Henrik
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    ÖStersjö, Stefan
    Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Hebert, David
    Universitet i Bergen.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Musical Transformations: Networked Performance inIntercultural Music Creation2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the worldwide lockdown affecting individual musicians and concert halls, streamingtechnology has become a central vehicle through which musicians and audiences can meet. Butthis forced move to digital presence also suggests new possibilities, beyond the ongoingcoronavirus pandemic. This paper discusses how networked performance, a format which hasengaged artists for decades as an artform in its own right, may also contribute to the sustaining ofcultural heritage among migrant/minority communities as well as to the development ofinnovative intercultural artistic practices. Building on the experience of our group, The SixTones, as well as on research carried out by Roger Mills (2019) and Ximena Alarcón Diaz, wewish to develop a more robust understanding of the possibilities, and the limitations, thatnetworked technology affords. The central source of our own work is drawn from MusicalTransformations, an ongoing project which studies the intersection between traditional andexperimental music in globalized society. We address the role of social interaction in the practicefor intercultural collaboration, developed by The Six Tones since 2006, and discuss how suchinteractions are made difficult when collaborating through mediation of digital technology. Inthis context we believe that it is possible to also study what the limitations that the technologiesimpose and what the nature of these limitations amount to. Such a study may be useful also inother areas of digital interaction. Qualitative analysis of video documentation from rehearsalsand performances constitute the foundation for the study. In the paper, we further discuss theprojected creation of a scene for intercultural exchange at Manzi Art Space in Hanoi, withreference to the first networked performance carried out live on a scene in Hanoi on July 12,2020, curated by The Six Tones at Manzi. This project situates the discussion even moreimmediately in the current developments of music culture at the time of the pandemic. Thepresentation, by the four authors, is supplemented with video from networked performances, aswell as interviews with the group and guest performers documented on video.

  • 26. Holzer, Derek
    et al.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Andre, Holzapfel
    Sounds of Futures Passed: Media Archaeology and Design Fiction as a NIME Methodology2021In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Shanghai, China, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a study of a workshop which invited composers, musicians, and sounddesigners to explore instruments from the history of electronic sound in Sweden. The workshopparticipants applied media archaeology methods towards analyzing one particular instrument fromthe past, the Dataton System 3000. They then applied design fiction methods towards imaginingseveral speculative instruments of the future. Each stage of the workshop revealed very specificutopian ideas surrounding the design of sound instruments. After introducing the background andmethods of the workshop, the authors present an overview and thematic analysis of the workshop'soutcomes. The paper concludes with some reflections on the use of this method-in-progress forinvestigating the ethics and affordances of historical electronic sound instruments. It also suggeststhe significance of ethics and affordances for the design of contemporary instruments.

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    fulltext
  • 27. Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    et al.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Hebert, David
    Universitet i Bergen.
    ÖStersjö, Stefan
    Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Studio Saigon: Telematic Performance and Recording Technologies in Light of the Covid-19 Pandemic2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to affect individual musicians, ensembles and concert institutions,streaming technology has become a central vehicle through which musicians and audiences can meet.This paper discusses how networked performance, a format which has engaged artists for decades as anartform in its own right, may contribute to the sustaining of cultural heritage among migrant/minoritycommunities as well as to the development of innovative intercultural artistic practices. Building on theexperience of our group, The Six Tones, we wish to develop a more robust understanding of thepossibilities, and the limitations, that networked technology affords. The central source of our own work isdrawn from Musical Transformations, an ongoing project which studies the intersection betweentraditional and experimental music in globalized society.The project has studied the dynamic history and contemporary performance practices of VoÚng CÙ“, aVietnamese song which has experienced a radical set of transformations since the 1920’s. Recordingtechnology has played a central role in this development, as evidenced even in the way its formalstructure was shaped to match the duration of the 78rpm records on which this music was recorded onlocal labels still in the 1960’s (Gibbs et al 2013). We note that interactions both inside and outsiderecording studios contribute to urban culture. From the perspective of the street in Ho Chi Minh City, bothrecording studios used in this project blended into their surroundings, amongst residences, tinyconvenience shops, hair salons, and restaurants selling pho and banh mi. Both studios also werenegatively affected by traffic noise from a steady stream of motorbikes and trucks as well as constructionprojects. Local businesses were evidently accustomed to encountering foreigners leaving the studios forbreaks in their recording sessions. Only a modicum of previous ethnomusicological studies haveconsidered the role of recording studios in urban culture, which promote business in local communitieswhile producing cultural products that have a lasting and expansive impact far beyond their neighborhood.Kay Shelemay observed that “recording technology is not only an integral part of our discipline’sintellectual history. It is an increasingly important part of our future as well” (Shelemay, 1991, p.288). Weargue that the rise of telematic performance in the time of the pandemic also points to new avenues forrecording technologies, inside and beyond the recording studio.

  • 28. Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Selfridge, Rod
    Holzapfel, ANdre
    R., Hölling
    Connecting Sound Design Future with Historical Creative Practices: Developing Digital Tools by Modelling Historical Sound Effects.2023In: Forum Acusticum 2023, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of three digitalsound prototypes based on three sounding objects se-lected from those in use at the Swedish Radio Sound Stu-dio. Knowledge about historical and current creative prac-tice was gathered through an in-depth interview with theSwedish Radio sound engineer and sound maker MichaelJohansson and the observation of his Foley practice. Adesign workshop was carried out with music composersand interaction designers to ideate how these historicalsound design concepts could be developed in the digitaldomain. On the basis of the workshop results, we builtthree prototypes that were exhibited at Tekniska Museetin Stockholm where we gathered feedback from 126 peo-ple. Finally, we discuss what we have learnt from utilisingan approach rooted in historical creative practice, empha-sizing benefits for contemporary digital sound design.

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  • 29. Pauletto, Sandra
    et al.
    Selfridge, Rod
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Holzapfel, André
    FROM FOLEY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE TO SONIC INTERACTION DESIGN: INITIAL RESEARCH CONDUCTED WITHIN THE RADIO SOUND STUDIOPROJECT2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes initial research conducted in The Ra-dio Sound Studio Project. 1 The aim of the project is todevelop novel sound design tools by digitally model histor-ical sound effects, found in the radio drama studio, utilis-ing methods from sound computing, ethnography, and de-sign. These novel sound tools will address both artisticsound practices as well as more utilitarian sonic interac-tion designs for new objects. The project also provides atangible approach to connecting new sound design devel-opments with historical literature and practice, and createnew opportunities for radio, TV and Foley studios. Thispaper focuses on the process of selection of the soundingobjects to be modelled, which was based on an in-depthinterview with Sveriges Radio’s sound engineer and soundmaker Michael Johansson as well as observations of hisFoley practice. It also describes the initial modelling ofone of these objects, and plans for future work

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  • 30. Skoogh, Franciska
    et al.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Performance values-an artistic research perspective on music performance anxiety in classical music2019In: Journal for Research in arts and sports education, ISSN 2535-2857, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Frisk, Henrik (Artist)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Baudry, Benoit (Contributor)
    Natanel Gustavsson, Erik (Composer)
    Durieux, Thomas (Researcher)
    Browser Chance Music2021Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Browser Chance Music lets the audience experience the high-frequency, invisible software activity that occurs in our mobile devices when we browse the web. Billions of citizens browse the web every day, everywhere. This activity is powered by billions of software operations that take care of connecting devices to the web and transporting the information from one side of the world to another. Yet, this amazing software activity is invisible, intangible and unknown by most users.

    Browser Chance Music explores interactive, spatialized sonification to let users experience this software activity. Through sound, we embody the rich software execution, which is usually disembodied and invisible on a regular interaction with software applications. One challenge we face in this project relates to the significant gap of temporality between the two phenomena: the visible act of browsing is performed at the speed of humans clicking buttons or swiping screens; meanwhile, software that runs in the browser to let humans access the world wide web, operates at a radically different speed, up to thousands of operations per second.

  • 32.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer, Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Concinnity2022Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second piece recently that I revisit James Tenney. It is an experiment in translating pitch distance to physical auditory space using Tenney's theory of harmonic space and the underlying concept of harmonic distance. Tenney devised an algorithm with which he created nearly symmetrical lattices of interrelated pitches, in which each pitch has a harmonic relationship to its surroundings, the fundamental being at the center. If the grid is constrained within the 7-limit he called it a 3,5,7-space and this is what this piece departs from. From the grid I constructed a series of somewhat symmetrical 4-note chords all sharing the same fundamental, and a few transpositions of one chord from three closely related pitches (3/2, 9/8 and 7/4). Each note in the grid is assigned a spatialized position relative to its position in the grid with the result that pitches at a low harmonic distance from the fundamental (octaves and fifths) are closer to the center of the physical space than more distant intervals. The saxophone is playing the fundamental from which the other pitches are generated in real time.

  • 33.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Exploring electronic music heritage through ethics and improvisation2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this lecture-recital Tresch and Dolan's notion that the material aspects, mediations and the telos of an instrument can provide grounds for an analysis of its  /ethics/ is discussed. It may first appear odd to speak of ethics in relation to objects such as a musical instruments, and this is an attempt to revisit the origin of this idea and critically examine it by briefly discussing its roots in Foucault's /History of Sexuality part 2/ . In the presentation a performance on the /Dataton 3000/, a modular synthesizer and audio mixer designed in Sweden in the 1970's, is used to illustrate how these ideas can be understood and critically assessed. To attempt to understand the qualities and the particularities of this instrument a wide range of parameters need to be considered, including those related to the context in which it was originally created. Yet, development of performance practices may also happen by simply disregarding such information and treat the instrument primarily as a vehicle for the creativity of its player. In the attempt to understand the dialectical relation between staying true to the instrument's origin (according to some principle) and allowing new practices to be formed on top of old, or by simply bypassing existing and/or forgotten practices, there is a need for a method. Though the notion of an ethics of instruments as sketched out by Tresch and Dolan appears to be useful, it also raises questions related to the agency of the instrument in a network af agents formed through performance and through the interfaces that emrge in the playing.

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  • 34.
    Frisk, Henrik (Musician, Composer)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Exploring electronic music heritage through ethics and improvisation2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented here is part of the research project /Historically informed design of sound synthesis: A multidisciplinary, structured approach to the digitisation and exploration of electronic music heritage/. <2> It engages with historically-informed sound synthesis through a collection of electronic instruments from the sixties and seventies collected by the Swedish Performing Arts Agency and archived by the Performing Arts Museum in Stockholm. The instruments in the collection are explored artistically in order to reveal both past practices as well as discover new ones.

    In this presentation I will talk about how my work in the project has had a big impact on the way I think about artistic practice. I will bring in the topic of improvisation as a method for understanding these systems, and ethics as a means to navigate the complex interrelations that are embedded. The theoretical foundation for the thinking here is taken from Michel Foucault's volume 3 of his /History of Sexuality/.

    In a wider scope of contemporary technologies, the rate at which the development in general is progressing can quickly turn objects sometimes less than a decade old incompatible with current systems. A hypothesis here is that by learning from early electronic instruments using a structured approach it may be possible to better understand the complexities of what may be seen as a kind of media archeology.

  • 35.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer, Curator)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    For Bill, Rising2022Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The title of this piece refers to my friend Bill (Brunson) and composer Jim Tenney (the reference in the title being to his piece "For Ann, Rising") both of whom have been incredibly important to me. The basic musical idea behind this composition is to use a simple synthesis model and create timbral variations through combining repetitions of the original sound. The tonality and the rhythms are both derived from a 7-limit, 11-note scale. Throughout the piece rhythms are treated as slowed down intervals and vice versa.

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  • 36.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Hernik Frisk & Rikard Lindell duo2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här projektet undersöker vi på övergripande nivå hur såväl musiker som publik kan få tillgång till information som kan bidra till en ny typ av konsertupplevelse där plats och tid är två dimensioner som delvis är upplösta.q En konsert i skogen kan upplevas som specifikt i skogen även om du som publik befinner dig i en annan skog eller någon annanstans och kanske vid en annan tidpunkt. Vi kritiskt granskar, utforskar, undersöker och utvecklar merged reality som en metod för att skapa närvaro och engagemang i en ny form för konsert som erbjuder nya upplevelsemässiga möjligheter.

    Projektet undersöker också musikernas behov av åtkomst av konstnärligt material, både det egna och sådant som kan finns tillgängligt externt. Vi undersöker hur musiker mer effektivt kan komma åt, använda och återanvända sådant material vid kompositionstillfället såväl som i framförandet eller improvisationen. Vi utgår från en holistisk syn på konserten som en aktivitet där val som görs innan och i stunden är en del av musikens uttryck och något som kan synliggöras för lyssnaren samt att detta kan skapa nya förutsättningar för upplevelsen av deltagande. Detta även om, eller inte minst när, både tid och plats är förskjutet. En integrerad konstnärlig process vars början och slut i tid och rum löses upp.

    I denna duo undersöker vi dessa frågor genom vår egen improvisationspraktik.

  • 37.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. 6906119372.
    Image Schema2020Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    *Image Schema* is music to a video created by pianist Johan Fröst. The visual material is a processed video recording of himself playing a short piano piece by Debussy. Fröst has used unsual angles and extreme close-ups as a technique for shooting the film and the video has been edited from the point of view of the structure of the music primarily. I approached the video only, not knowing what the underlying piano music was, in an attempt to test the hypothesis that aspects of the structure of the original music can be communicated through the visuals in the way the video was edited. Hence, in my composition process I have focused on the visual arrangement and organized the music accordingly. The material for the music are piano samples that have been gathere in a way that is similar to how the video is created: putting microphones at strange and unusual places and at odd angles. The sounds have been processed primarily using spectral techniques whith which the timbral qualities of the samples were adapted to work with the dynamics of the visual material.

    The reference for the title of this piece is the way it is explained by Mark Johnson in his book *The Body in the Mind*. The image schema at play here is the generalized idea that this system of images has anything to say about the music hidden behind them. It may serve as an identifying pattern that allows me, as well as the listener, to access a complex system of relationships of experiences and percepts. The setup is particular in this piece, but a video can always have this effect to the listener, as a distraction or as a vehicle for deep listening.

    Image Schema has been performed in concert Sweden (Engelbrektskyrkan) and Germany (ZKM)

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    film
  • 38.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Image Schema2021Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    /Image Schema/ is music to a video created by pianist Johan Fröst. The visual material is a processed video recording of himself playing a short piano piece by Debussy. Fröst has used unsual angles and extreme close-ups as a technique for shooting the film and the video has been edited from the point of view of the structure of the music primarily. I approached the video only, not knowing what the underlying piano music was, in an attempt to test the hypothesis that aspects of the structure of the original music can be communicated through the visuals in the way the video was edited. Hence, in my composition process I have focused on the visual arrangement and organized the music accordingly. The material for the music are piano samples that have been gathere in a way that is similar to how the video is created: putting microphones at strange and unusual places and at odd angles. The sounds have been processed primarily using spectral techniques whith which the timbral qualities of the samples were adapted to work with the dynamics of the visual material.

    The reference for the title of this piece is the way it is explained by Mark Johnson in his book /The Body in the Mind/. The image schema at play here is the generalized idea that this system of images has anything to say about the music hidden behind them. It may serve as an identifying pattern that allows me, as well as the listener, to access a complex system of relationships of experiences and percepts. The setup is particular in this piece, but a video can always have this effect to the listener, as a distraction or as a vehicle for deep listening.

    /Image Schema/ was premiered in Engelbrektskyrkan in Stockholm on Nowember 24, 2019.

  • 39.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Improvisation over Mimionimas: Improvisation over string quartet by Kim Hedås2020Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A short electroacoustic piece commissioned by the team behind Prelude to Nobel at KMH on Dec 9, 2020. It has been worked out using a physical model of a violin that I have programmed in Faust and that I play on with the Quneo controller in six separate layers. Each voice was recorded toghether with a recording of Hedås' piece. Hence, it serves as a mirror image hovering on top of the soft string quartet sound.

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    Improv_over_mimionimas
  • 40.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer, Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Elberling, Anders (Cinematographer)
    Machinic Propositions2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machinic propositions is an artistic project and an attempt tocritically examine Deleuze and Guattari's theorems ofdeterritorialization as found in chapter seven and ten of their seminalbook A Thousand Plateaus (Deleuze & Guattari, 1980).

    The artistic method is one where conceptual deduction and improvisationplay central roles. It has grown out of our thinking about contemporarymedia and our attempts to critically examine both our own pro-technicalapproach and the hyper media-landscape we live in. This method wasdeveloped based on our artistic ideas, the needs of the projects weengage in and the conditions of our respective practices. At the core ofour work lies the attempt to deconstruct the relationship between soundand image. Our work process is slow, and the work on the present projectbegan in 2016 and is likely to continue in the future.

    There are interesting parallels between the way we work, and the ideaput forward by Deleuze of style as the ability to "stammer in one's ownlanguage". Our working process is situated in the attempt to stutter in"language" while avoiding it in "speech".

    The modes of synchronization that have become central to our works willbe further explored through the modes of thinking relating to thetheorems introduced by D\&G. There are however, many points ofentry. The systems of de/re-territorialization in this context areinterpreted as attempts to detach both sound and image from their highlydefined modes of engagement. Not in order for them to merge into one,but to become what may be described as the opposite of a couple.

  • 41.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. 6906119372.
    pvm2020Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    *pvm* is an improvisation based on interactions with the Vietnamese master musician Pham Van Mon. These interactions were carried out in Vietnam on numerous trips to the southern parts of the country, on line in virtual presence interaction, and in a manner that involved sending material back and forth. The material has been further developed in online performances in concerts in Sweden and in Hanoi. This piece is part of the Transformations project, an artistic research project that investigates the impact of musical traditions in transformation, and which involves the Vietnamese-Swedish group The Six Tones and several other collaborators, including Pham Van Mon.  

    This structured improvisation was made using software that I have composed myself in PureData, Max, Supercollider and Faust. I play on a QuNeo physical controller and a laptop following ideas concerning laptop performance that I have developed over a number of years. The general philosophy is to layer tools and software in a complex system that dismantles some of the idiomatic traits of each piece of software by itself. In addition, the general complexity of the system adds a certain indeterminacy to it that encourages improvisatory strategies. Furthermore, some of the material is performed by the software KimAuto (KA), developed by Norwegian center Notam within the artistic research project Goodbye Intuition. KA is an automated improvisation machine that collects audio in real time, reorganizes it and plays it back following, as well as questioning, common free improvisation aesthetics. In this piece I fed it with material from previous pieces along with material from the recordings of Pham Van Mon.  

    This work relates perhaps primarily to the general theme of computational creativity techniques for the reasons explained above. To some extent it can be said to loosely deal with the reproduction of musical style, though not directly using machine learning. This however only slightly warped, in the ways that musical tradition, i.e. Vitenamese traditional music, is filtered through the process of electronic manipulation, and thereby distorted by it. However, I will argue that this is an important aspect of better understanding the advantages of techniques such as machine learning. The way that this project has developed both online and in physical meetings, and how it is performed, is to a high degree an example of emerging self-organization, though not only in an automated manner.  

    I find that one of the challenges in artistic practice in music is to find a proper balance between a systematic approach to the treatment of the musical and non musical material, and some kind of intuitive method with which the system can be manipulated and mastered. The system, which can be almost any conceptual structure, including a tonal system, a sound source and its possible variations, a data set to sonify, a synthesis model, or whatever is of relevance to the artistic idea. The manipulation part of it can also be any one technique, in a range of different methods. The purpose is to allow oneself to get acquainted with the system to the point where it becomes second nature when explored, examined and scrutinized, to the point that allows one to truly *play* or simply improvise with it.  

    The mastering of the systems, or concepts, is not a question of interpreting them. The main purpose is not to find out what the concept means and dwell into it, but rather to understand what it does. Any one system by itself is rarely what makes a piece work. Instead it is how it is set in motion, how it operates; to understand what it can do under different conditions. A concept as a point of departure for an artistic expression is like a part without a whole. Before it can be made useful it has to be conceptualized within the frame of the expression, and instantiated together with the practice with which it can unite. This can be achieved through play and improvisation. Considering my exercise with the software KA in this piece I started with a concept, a set of sounds, that by themselves were not really interesting. They have a certain meaning to me, because I have gone through the process of playing with them in a different context. But now, as I feed them to KA, they are empty. It is in the playing process that I interact with KA and where the concept is set into motion. For some of the sounds I fed it I could not reach a point that felt meaningful, but through the process of improvisation I managed to not only feel that *we*, KA and me, were playing the sounds in a way that I could sympathize with. More importantly, however, I also reached a position in which the boundary between myself and KA was dismantled and I could understand the larger system consisting of me and KA from the *inside*.  

    For a long time I have been interested in the ways in which technology affects how and what I play. One of the defining ideas has been to understand the interaction with technology as an encounter with another, and understand it less as a tool and more as an agent that I influence as much as it influences me. This process has led to questioning what interaction actually means in artistic practice and has taken a stance against the defining character of interaction as simply a mode of control. The main thread is the idea that all kinds of encounters with tools of some kind in the artistic process is an opportunity to enter into a larger sphere of interaction that creates difference, and that the prevailing idea of *controlling* the technology is a drive that may have a negative effect on the possibilities of the system. This reasoning has its roots in an aesthetic choice more concerned with the human capacity for collaboration than with personally and individually rooted attempts at artistic expression.  

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  • 42.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Quarantine Sessions Ensemble2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Coronavirus Crisis changed our lives and we had a long period withoutconcerts as we knew them. In addition to the problem of large audiences, theregulations also made it ‘virtually’ impossible for musicians to get together,to rehearse, or perform. However, many technologies and solutions were alreadyavailable, helping us to find new ways of collaborating and transporting our work to audiences. During thelockdowns and ever since we have been programming, testing, and rehearsing inan online environment between California, Berlin, and Ghent. We presentconcerts that connect musicians from these locations and often with guests fromother places. The sessions are broadcast live with audio and video feeds fromeach site.

  • 43.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer, Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Rain2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    /Rain/ is a composition with no end. The original harmonic evolution was determined by minute differences in tuning between four glasses suspended in the air as rain was collected in them and water evaporated. The gradual deterioration of the water in the tubes and the leaves that fall into the glasses further influenced the pitch. The installation was recorded twice a day and the current version is rendered from thos recordings using physical models of the original glass tubes. The spatialization is mapped to the same input data (rhythm, inensity and pitch).

  • 44.
    Frisk, Henrik (Composer, Curator)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Rain will evaporate2022Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Frisk, Henrik (Curator, Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    SMC2023 R1 concert2023Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chopper (2009 / 2018 / 2023) is back in a trio setting featuring Henrik Frisk on tenor sax. Ac-companists are Marise van Zyl (computer detonator) and Chris Chafe (celletto beaming in fromCalifornia). The approximately 12-minute performance utilizes the R1 Hall’s lovingly restoredWurlitzer Theater Organ. It is connected to real-time nuclear fission simulation software. Det-onations and changing experimental conditions are in Marise’s hands. Actual experiments inR1 were used to verify early fission models running on 1960’s mainframe computers. Theirmodern counterpart is a visualization by Alex Wellerstein. The Mighty Wurlitzer was recon-structed to fit in an organ chamber reminiscent of the shape and size of the original reactorcore. The reaction time theme of Chopper has the central soloist triggering sounds from theother players who respond as fast as possible despite network and other delays.1C

  • 46.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Snares2021Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic idea behind this composition is to use a simple synthesis model and create timbral variations through combining repetitions of the original sound. The tonality and the rhythm is derived from a 7-limit scale. In the piece rhythms are treated as slowed down intervals and vice versa. The textual representation of the piece is done in Org-mode and the extension for literal programming called Babel. This is an experiment in allowing constructing recreatable snippets from which the piece is created.

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