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  • 1.
    Falthin, Peter
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    The Meaning of Making: Mapping Strategies in Music Composition2016In: International Conference on Music Perception anc Cognition, 14th Biennial Meeting: Proceedings / [ed] Theodore Zanto, San Francisco: University of California Press, 2016, p. 183-185Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract—One way to think of creative processes is as recontextualizations of perceptions and conceptions of reality. Impressions and ideas are seen from new perspectives and connected in new ways before entered into a new context in a different form, which may or may not include shifts in modality or form of representation. This study is about how composition students give musical expression to extra-musical phenomena and how they relate their musical thinking to other forms of representation. It involves studying what mapping strategies the student composers develop in order to establish relationships between different forms of representation, but also to study the meaning making processes in both the analysis and synthesis phase of the restructuring of concepts.

    The how-questions imply a qualitative approach and method. Data comprise a wide variety of sketch material, as well as scores, performances and recordings of the finalized compositions, and in-depth interviews with the student composers in relation to these materials. In all the studied cases, composition process began with extramusical considerations in the form of narratives, imagery or some kind of physical phenomena (e.g. geometrical concepts, acoustical phenomena and tactile qualities). Typically there would appear several creative processes in different modalities converging into musical form along the composition process. Results suggest that these students intend their music to represent extramusical phenomena and concepts in as far as they take that as points of departure for developing compositional concepts, but also for shaping musical expression. To a varying degree, these extramusical considerations are meant to be conveyed in the music. 

  • 2.
    Falthin, Peter
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education.
    Dahlstedt, Palle
    Göteborgs universitet, IT-universitetet, Chalmers.
    Creative Structures or Structured Creativity?: Investigating algorithmic composition as a pedagogical tool2010In: The 11nth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC11): Book of Abstracts / [ed] Steven M. Demorest, Steven J Morrison & Patricia S Campbell, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2010, p. 125-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CREATIVE STRUCTURES OR STRUCTURED CREATIVITY (Investigation algorithmic composition as a pedagogical tool) Peter Falthin, PalleDahlstedt Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Chalmers Technical University, Gothenburg peter.falthin@kmh.se palle@chalmers.se

    ABSTRACT

    This empirical study aims to depict how composers develop and structure creative resources, aided by algorithmic methods and other means of structuring material and processes. The project is not meant to be conclusive, but rather to form a point of departure and raise questions for further theoretical and empirical study in the field. Implications for teaching and learning composition and for designing interactive musical tools are expected. In specific, this paper concerns concept development within learning of music composition: if, how and to what extent this is comparable to that of language-based learning. The research project in progress sets out to study cognitive processes of composers working to integrate the outcome of composition algorithms, with the subjective compositional aim and modus operandi. However, in most cases the composer is also designer of the algorithm or at least of its specific application to the compositional problem. Consequently the strategies involved in designing and applying compositional algorithms need to be considered and discussed insofar that they too are part of the integration process. The study at hand draws from research conducted in cultural-historical psychology, cognitive psychology and linguistic theory, concerning internalization, development of concepts and syntactic and semantic aspects of musical structures. 

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